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I'm looking for guidelines on how to design multi-type generic algorithms using templates in C++.

A reoccurring question for me is whether for instance, to write a reduce-like function likes this

template <typename Container, typename Element>
E reduce_something(const Container<Element> & a)
{
  // ...
}

or to skip the element type like this

template <typename Container>
Container::element_type reduce_something(const Container & a)
{
  // ...
}

and also when to use nested templates.

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2 Answers 2

I usually try to ensure that I impose as few requirements and restrictions on the template types as I reasonably can as a guiding principle.

template <typename Container, typename Element>
E reduce_something(const Container<Element> & a)
{
  // ...
}

This isn't correct, it would need to be something like:

template < template<typename> class Container, typename Element>
Element reduce_something(const Container<Element> & a)
{
  // ...
}

But this adds a lot of requirements on Container. It must take only one template parameter, so something like std::vector wouldn't do as it has an allocator template parameter. I can write a template function with just a non-template type Container without assuming that it is a template type and if the operations that I want to interact with Element do when the template is instantiate then everything will work anyway.

template <typename Container>
Container::element_type reduce_something(const Container & a)
{
  // ...
}

This adds a crucial requirement that Container must contain a element_type type member. It would be preferable to use a traits class so that you can create traits for standard containers ( which have value_type instead) and other types which you can't directly modify.

Probably a better approach is to take a range delimited by iterators. E.g.

#include <iterator>

template<InputIterator>
typename std::iterator_traits<InputIterator>::value_type
    reduce_something(InputIterator first, InputIterator last)
{
    // ...
}

There is already a suitable standard traits class and the algorithm will work with subranges, ranges delimited by pointers and all manner of containers.

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Have you considered the canonical C++ approach of passing in and returning one or more iterator types? In this case, pass in a start and end to designate the range and use either the same type or a different iterator type for the return value.

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