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Im trying to work with the example in the K and R book for this topic, but struggling.

I want an array of Char Arrays, whereby each element of the 'Father' Array points to an array of characters (string). Basically, I am reading from a file, line at a time, storing each line into an array, and then trying to store that array, into another array, which I can then sort via qsort.

But I can't seem to get anywhere with this! Anyhelp on my code is much appreciated, i.e. where to go from where I am!

EDIT: The problem is, the printing function isn't printing out my words that should be within the array of arrays, instead its just printing garbage, the main problem is, I'm not sure whether i am de-referencing things correctly, or not at all, whether I am adding it to the array of arrays correctly etc.

Regards.

#define MAXLINES 5000 /* max no. lines to be stored */
#define MAXLEN 1000 /* max length of single line */

char *lineptr[MAXLINES];

void writelines(char *lineptr[], int nlines);

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
 int nlines = 0, i, j, k;
 char line[MAXLEN];
 FILE *fpIn;
 fpIn = fopen(argv[1], "rb");
 while((fgets(line, 65, fpIn)) != NULL) {
     j = strlen(line);
     if (j > 0 && (line[j-1] == '\n')) {
         line[j-1] = '\0';
     }
     if (j > 8) {
         lineptr[nlines++] = line;
     }
 }  
 for(i = 0; i < nlines; i++)
     printf("%s\n", lineptr[i] );
return 0;    
}
share|improve this question
    
You've posted some code, but you haven't said what the problem is. A compiler error message? A runtime crash? Wrong results? Something else? –  Oliver Charlesworth Dec 29 '11 at 0:43
    
Editted, apologies. –  PnP Dec 29 '11 at 0:46
1  
Ok, the next step is to simplify the problem. Write a simpler program to confirm you have the file reading correct. Then write a separate simpler program to perform a sort. Once you have both of those working, then integrate them. –  Oliver Charlesworth Dec 29 '11 at 0:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Dan definitely found one error, the identical storage. But I think there are more bugs here:

while((fgets(line, 65, fpIn)) != NULL) {

Why only 65? You've got MAXLEN space to work with, you might as well let your input be a bit longer.

    j = strlen(line);
    if (j > 0 && (line[j-1] == '\n')) {
        line[j-1] = '\0';
    }
    if (j > 8) {
        lineptr[nlines++] = line;
    }
}

Why exactly j > 8? Are you supposed to be throwing away short lines? Don't forget to deallocate the memory for the line in this case, once you've moved to the dynamic allocation that Dan suggests.

Update

ott recommends strdup(3) -- this would be easy to fit into your existing system:

while((fgets(line, 65, fpIn)) != NULL) {
    j = strlen(line);
    if (j > 0 && (line[j-1] == '\n')) {
        line[j-1] = '\0';
    }
    if (j > 8) {
        lineptr[nlines++] = strdup(line);
    }
}

Dan recommended calloc(3), that would be only slightly more work:

line = calloc(MAXLINE, sizeof char);
while((fgets(line, 65, fpIn)) != NULL) {
    j = strlen(line);
    if (j > 0 && (line[j-1] == '\n')) {
        line[j-1] = '\0';
    }
    if (j > 8) {
        lineptr[nlines++] = line;
    line = calloc(MAXLINE, sizeof char);
    }
}

Of course, both these approaches will blow up if the memory allocation fails -- checking error returns from memory allocation is always a good idea. And there's something distinctly unbeautiful about the second mechanism.

share|improve this answer
    
I am working with WPA words, thus between 8 and 63 characters :) –  PnP Dec 29 '11 at 0:52
    
Really unsure where to start if Im honest :( –  PnP Dec 29 '11 at 1:00
    
Thanks very much for the update Sarnold! –  PnP Dec 29 '11 at 1:07

A problem is that line[MAXLEN] is an automatic variable, and so each time through the while loop it refers to the same array. You should dynamically allocate line each time through the while loop (line = calloc(MAXLEN, sizeof(char)) before calling fgets). Otherwise fgets always writes to the same memory location and lineptr always points to the same array.

share|improve this answer
    
That line memory would need to be allocated each time I read a line though, so I would need that in some sort of loop as well? –  PnP Dec 29 '11 at 0:53
    
Yes. That should be the first thing in the while loop. Then use fgets, then check for NULL and break out –  Dan Dec 29 '11 at 0:54
    
calloc with MAXLEN is overkill. lineptr[nlines++] = strdup(line); would be sufficient. –  ott-- Dec 29 '11 at 0:54
    
he can directly use lineptr[i] and not use line at all. using line in this case disturbs the comprehension. –  Hicham from CppDepend Team Dec 29 '11 at 0:55
    
Really unsure where to start if Im honest :( –  PnP Dec 29 '11 at 1:00

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