Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In this project I poke at, (I am PHP dev, not RoR), there is this function on a modal.

  def task 
    @task ||= if search_key 
      Project.trop_fish.tasks.find(:first, :conditions => ["description like ?", "Search key: #{search_key}%"]) 
    else 
      Project.trop_fish.tasks.find(:first, :conditions => ["(name = ? OR name like ?)","#{task_name}","#{task_name} {%}"]) 
    end 
  end

So it's trying to find a task, from the project called trop_fish. But whats the @task at the top.

Is it, assign the result of the finds from the if block to the @task?

Is it the same as

  def task 
    if search_key 
      @task = Project.trop_fish.tasks.find(:first, :conditions => ["description like ?", "Search key: #{search_key}%"]) 
    else 
      @task = Project.trop_fish.tasks.find(:first, :conditions => ["(name = ? OR name like ?)","#{task_name}","#{task_name} {%}"]) 
    end 
  end
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Almost, not quite. It is the same thing as this:

def task 
  if search_key 
    @task ||= Project.trop_fish.tasks.find(:first, :conditions => ["description like ?", "Search key: #{search_key}%"]) 
  else 
    @task ||= Project.trop_fish.tasks.find(:first, :conditions => ["(name = ? OR name like ?)","#{task_name}","#{task_name} {%}"]) 
  end 
end

The ||= indicates that the variable will only be set to the new value if it is not already set with a different value. As some people commenting have pointed out/to put it more simply, @task will be set to the new value if it is nil or false.

This portion of the RoR tutorial by Michael Hartl is a great explanation of the ||= operator.

@pguardino brings up a good point in that a PHP programmer may not be familiar with the fact that if there is no explicit return statement within a method in ruby, it will return the last non-conditional statement in the method as it's return value, so yes, @task is being returned.

There is another bit of text in the RoR tutorial which explains why it is advantageous to use the ||= operator when returning from a method. It is useful because it means the first call to the task method will perform an operation against the database to retrieve a task, but subsequent calls to the method within the same thread will return @task without making calls to the database (since the @task variable has already been set.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1. just an addition though, the long form would be @task = @task || (...). If @task is already truthy then the or short circuits and does not get evaluated. Truthiness is important when trying to understand ||= –  32bitkid Dec 29 '11 at 1:23
3  
@32bitkid Actually x ||= y is equivalent to x || x = y - there's a subtle difference which doesn't have any effect most of the time - rubyinside.com/… –  Gareth Dec 29 '11 at 1:25
    
@Gareth good point. Though truthiness still applies. :) –  32bitkid Dec 29 '11 at 1:31
1  
Maybe it's worth pointing out that all these methods return @task. I know that's not obvious to php guys. –  pguardiario Dec 29 '11 at 2:49

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.