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I have dumped a Windows SDK .lib file (kernel32.lib) with DUMPBIN, the output show me that there are two "versions" for every API name, for example:

_imp_ExitProcess@4

and

_ExitProcess@4

So, why there are two of the same with different name mangling? . Let say i want to call ExitProcess from NASM, wich of them should i use when declare EXTERN?, mi practice shows me that i can call any of them but i don't know which one is the "correct" or the "prefered" to stick with it.

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4  
_ExitProcess@4 is used by a naive compiler. __imp_ExitProcess@4 is used by a less naive compiler. –  Raymond Chen Dec 29 '11 at 5:02
    
@Raymond Excelent articles. But, is this relevant for asm rdevelopment?, assemblers behave like VS compilers? –  Wyvern666 Dec 29 '11 at 15:15
    
You can choose whether you want your assembly code to be naive or less naive. You can write code the naive way and call _ExitProcess@4 directly, or you can write it the less naive way and call __imp__ExitProcess@4 indirectly. –  Raymond Chen Dec 29 '11 at 16:16
    
@Raymond Ok i understand these, now.. what happen when using more simple linkers like ALINK wich only accept import librarys without decorators in the function names (just: "EXTERN ExitProcess") ??, that would be naive too?. –  Wyvern666 Dec 29 '11 at 17:12
    
Consult your linker documentation. –  Raymond Chen Dec 29 '11 at 17:14

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think the _imp_ version is meant to be used with __declspec(dllimport) on Visual C++ compilers to prevent potential conflicts with code in the same module.

You're not supposed to use that fact explicitly in your code -- just use the original function, i.e. _ExitProcess@4.

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