Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I recently tried to get access to a serial communication using a Bluetooth usb dongle. I used the C code below, and keep getting error 5, which is “Access denied”. I am the administrator for the system (which seemed to be the common solution to this problem on the forums) and no other application is accessing the same port I am using (also another common solution). I’m running on a Windows Vista Home Basic 32bit system. I was wondering if anyone had a solution for this My C code is:

HANDLE hComm;

hComm = CreateFile( _T("\\.\COM3"), GENERIC_READ | GENERIC_WRITE, 0, NULL, OPEN_EXISTING, 0, NULL);

if (hComm == INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE)
	printf("Error number: %ld\n", GetLastError());
else
	printf("success\n");
share|improve this question
    
+1 for an example that correctly shows use of the _T macro on the string constant so that the code is independent of the compile-time choice of ANSI or UNICODE build. –  RBerteig May 15 '09 at 1:14
    
As an additional data point, I'd recommend verifying the COM port is actually accessible by a simple terminal application like HyperTerminal. Is it? –  Hexagon May 15 '09 at 4:34

4 Answers 4

I don't know if this is your problem or not, but I suspect you need to escape the backslashes in the path, like so: "\\\\.\\COM3"

share|improve this answer
    
+1, I believe this is the answer. This is an insidious bug that will haunt C programmers on Windows until Windows is no more. –  RBerteig May 15 '09 at 1:13
    
Actually this is only necessary for COM10 and higher. For lower COMs, COM3 will work as well –  Eli Bendersky May 15 '09 at 12:34

That does look like you have to escape your backslashes again. You can also verify that the COM port you're targeting exists on your system by using an object viewer, such as WinObj (http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/bb896657.aspx), although I don't know if WinObj runs on Vista.

share|improve this answer

In my experience the backslashes are not needed

hComm = CreateFile( _T("COM3"), GENERIC_READ | GENERIC_WRITE, 0, NULL, OPEN_EXISTING, 0, NULL);
share|improve this answer
1  
Backslashes are not needed for COM1 through COM9; they ARE needed for COM10 and above. –  Adam Rosenfield May 15 '09 at 0:07
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Thanks for the tips but it turns out the bluetooth passkey was not set properly and therefore it was denying access to the serial port.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.