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I came across this example of C99 Variable-length arrays on Wikipedia:

float read_and_process(int n)
{
    float vals[n];

    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)
        vals[i] = read_val();
    return process(vals, n);
}

Is this incorrect? I was under the impression that variable-length arrays are still just pointers which means the above code is passing the expired pointer vals to the process(...) function.

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3  
Arrays are not pointers. They just decay to pointers -- annoyingly easily, some would say. –  cHao Dec 29 '11 at 5:47
    
+1 for "Arrays are not pointers". See also section 6 of the comp.lang.c FAQ –  Keith Thompson Dec 29 '11 at 6:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The pointer hasn't expired. It is a pointer to valid memory until the end of the function read_and_process. Which means it is still defined when process is called.

This would be an example of invalid usage:

float read_and_process(int n)
{
    float vals[n];

    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)
        vals[i] = read_val();
    return vals;
}
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Oh ok that makes sense. As long as you're growing the stack the memory address must still be valid. –  Jeff Dec 29 '11 at 5:50
1  
@Jeff: A better way to look at it: the array (or any local non-static object) continues to exist until the function that created it returns. (Actually it's tied to the enclosing block, but it's the same in this case.) The lifetime of a local object is a span of time during execution, not a region of program text. Calling process doesn't terminate the execution of read_and_process, so the array still exists. –  Keith Thompson Sep 23 '13 at 20:24

Don't forget that the stack frame that contains all of read_and_process()'s automatic variables, including float vals[n], is still valid and in memory when process() is executed.

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I would think trying to return an array would be a bad idea. It would be best to create the array before calling the function and then just passing the array to the function instead (a pointer to it).

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It's not possible to return an array from a function. Returning the address of (the first element of) a local non-static array is a bad idea -- but the function in the question doesn't do that. –  Keith Thompson Sep 23 '13 at 20:22

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