Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

i'm working on a dispatching script, it takes a string with a command, does some cooking to it and then parses it. But i can't grab a hold into the referencing:

Use::strict;
Use:warnings;

my($contexto,$cmd,$target,$ultpos,@params);
my $do= "echo5 sample string that says stuff ";

$target="";
$cmd="";
$_="";
# i do some cumbersome string parsing to get the array with the exploded string and then call parsear(@command)

sub parsear{

my %operations=(
'echo' => \&echo,
'status' => \&status,
'echo5' => \&echo5,
);

my $op= $_[0];
if ($operations{$op}){
    $operations{$op}->(@_);
    print "it exists\n";
}else{
    print "incorrect command.\n";
    }
}




sub status{
    print "correct status.\n";
}

sub echo{
    shift(@_);
    print join(' ',@_) . "\n";
}

sub echo5{
    shift(@_);
    print join(' ',@_) . "\n" x 5;
}

I don't really know what the problem is, if the sub does not exists, it never says "incorrect command", and if i call for example "echo5 hello" it should print out

hello
hello
hello
hello
hello

but it does nothing.

And when i call echo it works as espected. Can someone explain this magic to me? note: i'm on the latest version of strawberry perl

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted
use strict;  # use is a keyword
use warnings;

# all these variables are not needed

sub parsear {  # learn to indent correctly
    my %operations = (
        'echo'   => \&echo,
        'status' => \&status,
        'echo5'  => \&echo5,
    );
    my $op = shift;  # take first element off @_
    if ($operations{$op}) {
        print "$op exists\n";  # make your status msg useful
        $operations{$op}->(@_);
    } else {
        print "incorrect command: $op\n";  # and your error msg
    }
}    

sub status {
    print "correct status.\n";
}

sub echo {
    # shift(@_); # this is no longer needed, and now echo can be used as a
                 # normal subroutine as well as a dispatch target
    print join(' ',@_) . "\n";
}

sub echo5 {
    # shift(@_); # this is no longer needed
    print +(join(' ',@_) . "\n") x 5;  # parens needed since x binds tightly
}

then running:

parsear 'status';
parsear 'echo', 'hello';
parsear 'echo5', 'hello';
parsear 'an error';

results in:

status exists
correct status.
echo exists
hello
echo5 exists
hello
hello
hello
hello
hello
incorrect command: an error

I am not sure what cumbersome string parsing you are doing since you did not include it, but if you are parsing a string like

my $do = "echo5 sample string that says stuff ";

where the command is the first word, and the arguments are the rest, you can either split everything:

parsear split /\s+/, $do;

or use a regex to cut the first word off:

my ($cmd, $arg) = $do =~ /^(\w+)\s*(.*)/;

parsear $cmd => $arg;

you dont even need the variables:

parsear $do =~ /^(\w+)\s*(.*)/;

finally, the echo5 subroutine is a bit more complicated than it needs to be. It could be written as:

sub echo5 {
    print "@_\n" x 5;  # "@_" means join($", @_) and $" defaults to ' '
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1: However, the shift operations now documented as # this should not be here were needed in the original code because the original does not have the my $op = shift; that your code does. You're right that they are not needed with the shift in parsear; but they were needed in the original. –  Jonathan Leffler Dec 29 '11 at 6:38
    
Agreed, I will adjust the comment to make it clearer. –  Eric Strom Dec 29 '11 at 6:49
    
You can also use split rather than a regex to "cut the first word off": my($cmd, $arg) = split /\s+/, $do, 2; –  tadmc Dec 29 '11 at 16:01

The x command binds differently from how you were expecting; you probably wanted:

print ((join(' ', @_) . "\n") x 5);

Both extra sets of parentheses seemed to be necessary.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.