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For instance, if I have a list

[1,4,2,3,5,4,5,6,7,8,1,3,4,5,9,10,11]

This algorithm should return [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11].

To clarify, the longest list should run forwards. I was wondering what is an algorithmically efficient way to do this (preferably not O(n^2))?

Also, I'm open to a solution not in python since the algorithm is what matters.

Thank you.

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2  
why not [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11]. I see no reason these numbers are not included since they do not have to be adjacent. –  Serdalis Dec 29 '11 at 6:37
    
Sorry, my mistake. Thanks for the correction. –  David Faux Dec 29 '11 at 6:39
2  
Can the longest consecutive sequence start at a number other than 1? –  Josh Rosen Dec 29 '11 at 6:40
1  
Should the algorithm work both forwards and backwards? –  Makoto Dec 29 '11 at 6:44
    
Just forwards, no need for backwards. –  David Faux Dec 29 '11 at 6:46

10 Answers 10

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Here is a simple one-pass O(n) solution:

s = [1,4,2,3,5,4,5,6,7,8,1,3,4,5,9,10,11,42]
maxrun = -1
rl = {}
for x in s:
    run = rl[x] = rl.get(x-1, 0) + 1
    print x-run+1, 'to', x
    if run > maxrun:
        maxend, maxrun = x, run
print range(maxend-maxrun+1, maxend+1)

The logic may be a little more self-evident if you think in terms of ranges instead of individual variables for the endpoint and run length:

rl = {}
best_range = xrange(0)
for x in s:
    run = rl[x] = rl.get(x-1, 0) + 1
    r = xrange(x-run+1, x+1)
    if len(r) > len(best_range):
        best_range = r
print list(best_range)
share|improve this answer
2  
+1 Chapeau !!!! –  jimifiki Dec 29 '11 at 10:29
    
@RaymondHettinger - should that last line be: print range(maxend-maxrun+1, maxend+1)? Otherwise for s = [1,4,2,3,5,4,9,10,11,5,6,7,8,1,3,4,5] I only get [4, 5, 6, 7, 8], not [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8]. –  Paul McGuire Dec 29 '11 at 11:45
    
@nightcracker - did you run it and get an IndexError, or are you just running this in your head? The chained assignment works right-to-left, and rl.get has a default value of 0 passed in, so no IndexError there. And since rl[1] gets the value of 0+1=1, then it can be copied to run, and again, no IndexError. Try running this, it really does work correctly. –  Paul McGuire Dec 29 '11 at 12:34
    
@Paul McGuire, agree, I think it should be maxrun instead of run too. –  sunqiang Dec 29 '11 at 13:09
    
Thanks for the typo fix. –  Raymond Hettinger Dec 29 '11 at 17:36

Not that clever, not O(n), could use a bit of optimization. But it works.

def longest(seq):
  result = []
  for v in seq:
    for l in result:
      if v == l[-1] + 1:
        l.append(v)
    else:
      result.append([v])
  return max(result, key=len)
share|improve this answer
    
Arrrrg... 10 secs before I hit "post your answer"... you won! ;) +1 –  mac Dec 29 '11 at 6:56
    
Actually there is no *O*(n) implementation for this :-) –  Abhijit Dec 29 '11 at 7:06
    
This is O(n^2), as is mine. Need to think of a different approach. –  jknupp Dec 29 '11 at 8:15
    
@Abhijit: There is, look at Raymond Hettingers's. –  nightcracker Dec 29 '11 at 12:35

You can use The Patience Sort implementation of the Largest Ascending Sub-sequence Algorithm

def LargAscSub(seq):
    deck = []
    for x in seq:
        newDeck = [x]
        i = bisect.bisect_left(deck, newDeck)
        deck[i].insert(0, x) if i != len(deck) else deck.append(newDeck)
    return [p[0] for p in deck]

And here is the Test results

>>> LargAscSub([1,4,2,3,5,4,5,6,7,8,1,3,4,5,9,10,11])
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11]
>>> LargAscSub([1, 2, 3, 11, 12, 13, 14])
[1, 2, 3, 11, 12, 13, 14]
>>> LargAscSub([11,12,13,14])
[11, 12, 13, 14]

The Order of Complexity is O(nlogn)

There was one note in the wiki link where they claimed that you can achieve O(n.loglogn) by relying on Van Emde Boas tree

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2  
Doesn't the result have to be consecutive integers? –  srgerg Dec 29 '11 at 6:53
    
@srgerg, Just check the above commented question from Serdalis and Chi Zeng's reply –  Abhijit Dec 29 '11 at 6:58
    
It's not largest ascending, it's largest consecutive ascending. –  jknupp Dec 29 '11 at 7:27

How about using a modified Radix Sort? As JanneKarila pointed out the solution is not O(n). It uses Radix sort, which wikipedia says Radix sort's efficiency is O(k·n) for n keys which have k or fewer digits.

This will only work if you know the range of numbers that we're dealing with so that will be the first step.

  1. Look at each element in starting list to find lowest, l and highest, h number. In this case l is 1 and h is 11. Note, if you already know the range for some reason, you can skip this step.

  2. Create a result list the size of our range and set each element to null.

  3. Look at each element in list and add them to the result list at the appropriate place if needed. ie, the element is a 4, add a 4 to the result list at position 4. result[element] = starting_list[element]. You can throw out duplicates if you want, they'll just be overwritten.

  4. Go through the result list to find the longest sequence without any null values. Keep a element_counter to know what element in the result list we're looking at. Keep a curr_start_element set to the beginning element of the current sequence and keep a curr_len of how long the current sequence is. Also keep a longest_start_element and a `longest_len' which will start out as zero and be updated as we move through the list.

  5. Return the result list starting at longest_start_element and taking longest_len

EDIT: Code added. Tested and working

#note this doesn't work with negative numbers
#it's certainly possible to write this to work with negatives
# but the code is a bit hairier
import sys
def findLongestSequence(lst):
    #step 1
    high = -sys.maxint - 1

    for num in lst:
        if num > high:
            high = num

    #step 2
    result = [None]*(high+1)

    #step 3
    for num in lst:
        result[num] = num

    #step 4
    curr_start_element = 0
    curr_len = 0
    longest_start_element = -1
    longest_len = -1

    for element_counter in range(len(result)):
        if result[element_counter] == None:

            if curr_len > longest_len:
                longest_start_element = curr_start_element
                longest_len = curr_len

            curr_len = 0
            curr_start_element = -1

        elif curr_start_element == -1:
            curr_start_element = element_counter

        curr_len += 1

    #just in case the last element makes the longest
    if curr_len > longest_len:
        longest_start_element = curr_start_element
        longest_len = curr_len


    #step 5
    return result[longest_start_element:longest_start_element + longest_len-1]
share|improve this answer
    
Step 4 iterates over the result list n times, so this is not O(n). –  jknupp Dec 29 '11 at 7:54
    
@jknupp No, you just need to go through one time. It's the same as finding the max value from a list. Except it finds the longest sequence in the list. suppose list = [1,2,3,null,5,6,7,8,null,10] I see that [1,2,3] is length 3 so I save the start index. Then see that [5,6,7,8] is length 4 so update the longest index/length vars. [8] doesn't change it. One loop, found the longest. –  jb. Dec 29 '11 at 8:12
    
The n in O(n) refers to the size of the input list. The range of values can be vastly larger and independent from the length of list. –  Janne Karila Dec 29 '11 at 8:50
    
@JanneKarila my mistake, you are quite right. from wikipedia Radix sort's efficiency is O(k·n) for n keys which have k or fewer digits. –  jb. Dec 29 '11 at 8:59

If the result really does have to be a sub-sequence of consecutive ascending integers, rather than merely ascending integers, then there's no need to remember each entire consecutive sub-sequence until you determine which is the longest, you need only remember the starting and ending values of each sub-sequence. So you could do something like this:

def longestConsecutiveSequence(sequence):
    # map starting values to largest ending value so far
    map = collections.OrderedDict()

    for i in sequence:
        found = False
        for k, v in map.iteritems():
            if i == v:
                map[k] += 1
                found = True

        if not found and i not in map:
            map[i] = i + 1

    return xrange(*max(map.iteritems(), key=lambda i: i[1] - i[0]))

If I run this on the original sample date (i.e. [1,4,2,3,5,4,5,6,7,8,1,3,4,5,9,10,11]) I get:

>>> print list(longestConsecutiveSequence([1,4,2,3,5,4,5,6,7,8,1,3,4,5,9,10,11]))
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11]

If I run it on one of Abhijit's samples [1,2,3,11,12,13,14], I get:

>>> print list(longestConsecutiveSequence([1,2,3,11,12,13,14]))
[11, 12, 13, 14]

Regrettably, this algorithm is O(n*n) in the worst case.

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Warning: This is the cheaty way to do it (aka I use python...)

import operator as op
import itertools as it

def longestSequence(data):

    longest = []

    for k, g in it.groupby(enumerate(set(data)), lambda(i, y):i-y):
        thisGroup = map(op.itemgetter(1), g)

        if len(thisGroup) > len(longest):
            longest = thisGroup

    return longest


longestSequence([1,4,2,3,5,4,5,6,7,8,1,3,4,5,9,10,11, 15,15,16,17,25])
share|improve this answer

You need the Maximum contiguous sum(Optimal Substructure):

def msum2(a):
    bounds, s, t, j = (0,0), -float('infinity'), 0, 0

    for i in range(len(a)):
        t = t + a[i]
        if t > s: bounds, s = (j, i+1), t
        if t < 0: t, j = 0, i+1
    return (s, bounds)

This is an example of dynamic programming and is O(N)

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O(n) solution works even if the sequence does not start from the first element.

Warning does not work if len(A) = 0.

A = [1,4,2,3,5,4,5,6,7,8,1,3,4,5,9,10,11]
def pre_process(A): 
    Last = {}
    Arrow = []
    Length = []
    ArgMax = 0
    Max = 0
    for i in xrange(len(A)): 
        Arrow.append(i)
        Length.append(0)  
        if A[i] - 1 in Last: 
            Aux = Last[A[i] - 1]
            Arrow[i] = Aux
            Length[i] = Length[Aux] + 1
        Last[A[i]] = i 
        if Length[i] > Max:
            ArgMax = i 
            Max = Length[i]
    return (Arrow,ArgMax)  

(Arr,Start) = pre_process(A) 
Old = Arr[Start] 
ToRev = []
while 1: 
    ToRev.append(A[Start]) 
    if Old == Start: 
        break
    Start = Old 
    New = Arr[Start]
    Old = New
ToRev.reverse()
print ToRev     

Pythonizations are welcome!!

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Ok, here's yet another attempt in python:

def popper(l):
    listHolders = []
    pos = 0
    while l:
        appended = False
        item = l.pop()
        for holder in listHolders:
            if item == holder[-1][0]-1:
                appended = True
                holder.append((item, pos))
        if not appended:
            pos += 1
            listHolders.append([(item, pos)])
    longest = []
    for holder in listHolders:
        try:
            if (holder[0][0] < longest[-1][0]) and (holder[0][1] > longest[-1][1]):
                longest.extend(holder)
        except:
            pass
        if len(holder) > len(longest):
            longest = holder
    longest.reverse()
    return [x[0] for x in longest]

Sample inputs and outputs:

>>> demo = list(range(50))
>>> shuffle(demo)
>>> demo
[40, 19, 24, 5, 48, 36, 23, 43, 14, 35, 18, 21, 11, 7, 34, 16, 38, 25, 46, 27, 26, 29, 41, 8, 31, 1, 33, 2, 13, 6, 44, 22, 17,
 12, 39, 9, 49, 3, 42, 37, 30, 10, 47, 20, 4, 0, 28, 32, 45, 15]
>>> popper(demo)
[1, 2, 3, 4]
>>> demo = [1,4,2,3,5,4,5,6,7,8,1,3,4,5,9,10,11]
>>> popper(demo)
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11]
>>>
share|improve this answer

This should do the trick (and is O(n)):

target = 1
result = []
for x in list:
    for y in result:
        if y[0] == target:
            y[0] += 1
            result.append(x)

For any starting number, this works:

result = []
for x in mylist:
    matched = False
    for y in result:
        if y[0] == x:
            matched = True
            y[0] += 1
            y.append(x)
    if not matched:
        result.append([x+1, x])
return max(result, key=len)[1:]
share|improve this answer
    
+1, unless the sequence can start at numbers other than 1. –  user334856 Dec 29 '11 at 6:41
5  
This will find the first, not the largest, starting with 1. [2, 3, 4, 5, 1, 2] –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Dec 29 '11 at 6:41
1  
why dont you or upvoters check the code?. How could you subscribe y the first time ? (TypeError: 'int' object is unsubscriptable) –  joaquin Dec 29 '11 at 7:02
1  
The first code sample returns an empty list, and the second raises TypeError: 'int' object is not subscriptable on the line if y[0] == x. –  David Z Dec 29 '11 at 7:16
1  
Also False should be capitalized, but I fixed that before I ran it. –  David Z Dec 29 '11 at 7:19

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