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Going from 1.4 to 1.5, there seem to be many undocumented changes in addition to the documented ones.

In 1.4 I had:

new TextField<BigDecimal>("capitalInput", 
        new PropertyModel<BigDecimal>(model, "capital")) {
    @Override
    public IConverter getConverter(Class<?> type) {
        return new MonetaryBigDecimalConverter();
    } 
};

With 1.5, I changed that like so (to match how getConverter() is now declared):

new TextField<BigDecimal>("capital", 
        new PropertyModel<BigDecimal>(model, "capital")) {
    @Override
    public <C> IConverter<C> getConverter(Class<C> type) {
        return new MonetaryBigDecimalConverter();
    }
};

Which my IDE shows as just unchecked assignment warning. But then trying to build the project it's actually a compilation error:

incompatible types
found   : com.company.MonetaryBigDecimalConverter
required: org.apache.wicket.util.convert.IConverter<C>

The custom MonetaryBigDecimalConverter looks something like this (1.5):

public class MonetaryBigDecimalConverter extends BigDecimalConverter {
    @Override
    public String convertToString(BigDecimal value, Locale locale) {
        // ...
    }
}

How can I make this work again?

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If the BigDecimalConverter is the one from wicket, this should be working since it implements IConverter<java.math.BigDecimal>. Otherwise you could try to implement that interface on your own converter. Which should already follow the contract... –  Nicktar Dec 29 '11 at 13:31
    
BigDecimalConverter above is from Wicket, and I had actually tried adding (redundant) IConverter<java.math.BigDecimal> to MonetaryBigDecimalConverter, but that didn't help... –  Jonik Dec 29 '11 at 13:44

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Since Wicket 1.5 converter has a generic type parameter:

IConverter<C>

Note that the type argument C of #getConverter() is not bound to the type parameter of your textfield, so you should test the requested type:

new TextField<BigDecimal>("capital", 
        new PropertyModel<BigDecimal>(model, "capital")) {
    @Override
    public <C> IConverter<C> getConverter(Class<C> type) {
        if (type == BigDecimal) {
            return (IConverter<C>) new MonetaryBigDecimalConverter();
        } else {
            return super.getConverter(type);
        }
    }
};

You have to explicitely cast your converter to the requested IConverter to quiet the compiler. Or with your workaround you're dropping into a raw type, thus sidestepping the problem.

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1  
Thanks! Too bad the Wicket API doesn't seem optimal here. (I'd of course want to return IConverter<BigDecimal> in case of TextField<BigDecimal> - though I'm not sure if it's possible with Java generics & Wicket architecture.) –  Jonik Jan 2 '12 at 13:12

I have no idea why, but the following small change in getConverter method made it compile.

@Override
public <C> IConverter<C> getConverter(Class<C> type) {
    IConverter converter = new MonetaryBigDecimalConverter();
    return converter;
}

I just extracted the MonetaryBigDecimalConverter instance into a varible of type IConverter. A field or constant would work similarly. (NB: the type must not be IConverter<C> or IConverter<BigDecimal>.) This code still produces "unchecked assignment" warning, but at least it compiles.

I'd be grateful if someone added an explanation or a better solution altogether. I am certainly no expert when it comes to Java generics oddities.

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