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It is sufficient to say that I am new to C so please have show some mercy ;).

I'm trying to compare two strings. The output shouldn't contain common characters. Sadly it does.

Here is the code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main(void) 
{
    const char msg[15] = "blueberry";
    int c;
    int s[15];
    int j = 0;
    int i = 0;
    int k= 0;
    int ok = 0;
    int t = 0;

    while (i < 15 && (c = getchar()) != '\n')
    {
        s[i] = c;
        ++i;
    }

    for (t=j=0; t < 15; ++t)
    {
        ok = 1;
        //printf ("%c", s[t]);
    }

    for (k=0; msg[k] != '\0'; ++k)
    {
        if (s[t] == msg[k]) 
        {
            ok = 0;
        }
    }

    if (ok == 1)
    {
        s[j] = s[t];
        j++;
    }
    s[j] = '\0';

    for (j = 0; j < 15; ++j)
        printf ("%c ", s[j]);
}

The input from the keyboard is blackberry, expected output should've been U but sadly it is not. Any help please. Also why is it entering the nested for loop irrespective of condition?


My big thanks to everyone, it helped me a lot. I've figured out a way & am ok with the output. I've borrowed some ideas from A4L :).

share|improve this question
    
You forgot to tell us precisely what the code is trying to do, and precisely what it does instead. I can think of lots of pieces of code that output 'U'. And I can also think of lots of pieces of code that do not output 'U'. –  Mike Nakis Dec 29 '11 at 9:07
    
there's a } closure misplaced. the if (ok == 1) should be in the for loop. –  BigMike Dec 29 '11 at 9:08
    
You fill input from user in s[] but you checked msg[]. why? –  Gil.I Dec 29 '11 at 9:10
    
I've fixed the formatting to reflect the real structure of the program. My question is: what nested for loop? –  JeremyP Dec 29 '11 at 9:32
    
the for containing the if (s[t] == msg[k]). it sets ok to 0, thus saving if the strings differs, but then it's tested just once. IMHO op was attempting to have a int [] for storing which char was different, but after rearranging too many times the code has lost something (the 15 times initialization of the ok var is a good hint to this). There's also mess with indexes (t will always be 15 after the for loop). Basically this piece of code is way to rearranged to undestand what OP was trying to achieve. –  BigMike Dec 29 '11 at 10:53

6 Answers 6

To compare two string, you can use strcmp().

The following is a string compare program that you can use for your reference. I has both array and pointer version for better understanding.

#include <stdio.h>

int strcmp1(char a[], char b[])
{
        int i=0;
        while (a[i] == b[i]) {
                if (a[i] == '\0')
                        return 0;
                i++;
        }

        return a[i]-b[i];
}

int strcmp2(char *a, char *b)
{
        while (*a == *b) {
                if (*a == '\0')
                        return 0;
                a++; b++;
        }
        return *a-*b;
}

int main()
{
        char s1[] = "test string1";
        char s2[] = "test string";
        char s3[] = "aaa";
        char s4[] = "bbb";

        printf("strcmp1(%s, %s) = %d \n", s1, s2, strcmp1(s1, s2));
        printf("strcmp2(%s, %s) = %d \n", s3, s4, strcmp2(s3, s4));

        return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
yes and what about outputting the chars not in both strings? –  BigMike Dec 29 '11 at 9:11
    
@BigMike I was just trying to give a reference/hint for the author to try and learn strings operations in C –  Sangeeth Saravanaraj Dec 29 '11 at 9:14
    
Thanks a lot everyone. It helped me a lot. Thanks again! –  user1115145 Jan 16 '12 at 10:15

given that msg contains "blueberry" and s contains "blackberry" this should do it

for (int i=0; i < strlen(msg); i++) {
  for (int j = 0; j < strlen(s); j++) {
    if (msg[i] != s[j]) {
       printf ("%c", msg[i]);
    }
  }
}

yes it's ugly (using the strlen in the for gives me the chills, but I'm still low on coffeine today ^^)

share|improve this answer

i guess you want to find the first letter where the input differs from message

here is your own code with some fixes

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main(void) {
const char msg[15] = "blueberry";
int c;
char s[15];
int i = 0;
int k= 0;
int ok = 0;


while (i < 15 && (c = getchar()) != '\n')
{
    s[i] = (char) c;
    ++i;
}

// make sure to terminate the string after hitting enter
s[i] = '\0';

printf("input: %s\n", s);
printf("messg: %s\n", msg);

// run through both input and message with one counter
for (k=0; ok == 0 && msg[k] != '\0' && s[k] != '\0'; )
{
    // if different chars stop
    if (s[k] != msg[k]){
        ok = 1;
    } else {
        // next char
        k++;
    }
}
if (ok == 1)
{
    printf ("diff @ index %d -> %c\n", k, msg[k]);
}
else
{
    printf ("no diff\n");
}

return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

//Length to match
int comm(char* s1, char* s2){
    int len = 0;
    while(*s1 && *s2 && *s1++ == *s2++)
        ++len;
    return len;
}
//commdiffcomm
/*
int commr(char* s1, char* s2){
    int len = 0, limit;
    int len1,len2;
    len1 = strlen(s1);
    len2 = strlen(s2);
    limit = len1 > len2 ? len2 : len1;
    s1 = s1 + len1;
    s2 = s2 + len2;
    while(limit-- && *--s1 == *--s2)
        ++len;
    return len;
}
//bad
int diff(char* s1, char* s2, int* len1, int* len2){
    int len, lenr, s1_len, s2_len, wk_max, i, j;

    len = comm(s1, s2);
    if(strcmp(s1, s2)==0){
        *len1 = *len2 = 0;
        return len;
    }
    lenr = commr(s1, s2);
    *len1 = strlen(s1) - len - lenr;
    *len2 = strlen(s2) - len - lenr;
    return len;
}
*/
int diff(char* s1, char* s2, int* len1, int* len2){
    int len, s1_len, s2_len, wk_max, i, j;

    len = comm(s1, s2);
    if(strcmp(s1, s2)==0){
        *len1 = *len2 = 0;
        return len;
    }
    s1_len = strlen(s1 + len + 1);
    s2_len = strlen(s2 + len);
    wk_max = 0;
    for(i = 1; i < s1_len ; i++){
        for(j = 0; j < s2_len; j++){
            int com_len;
            com_len = comm(s1 + len + i, s2 + len + j);
            if(wk_max < com_len){
                wk_max = com_len;
                *len1 = i;
                *len2 = j;
            }
        }
    }
    return len;
}

int main(){
    char str1[16] = "blueberry";
    char str2[16] = "blackberry";
    char dif1[16] = "";
    char dif2[16] = "";
    int len0;//length of top to diff pos
    int len1;
    int len2;

    len0 = diff(str1, str2, &len1, &len2);
    strncpy(dif1, str1 + len0, len1);
    strncpy(dif2, str2 + len0, len2);
    if(len1 !=0 && len2 != 0){
        printf("%s different %s at position %d length %d (\"%s\")\n", str1, str2, len0, len1, dif1);
        printf("%s different %s at position %d length %d (\"%s\")\n", str2, str1, len0, len2, dif2);
    } else {
        printf("two string is same.");
    }
    return 0;
}

/*
blueberry different blackberry at position 2 length 2 ("ue")
blackberry different blueberry at position 2 length 3 ("ack")
*/
share|improve this answer

There are a few problems with the code as is:

  • You don't null-terminate your input string. Attempting to use it with c string functons would spell trouble. To fix that, change

    while (i < 15 && (c = getchar()) != '\n')
    {
        s[i] = c;
        ++i;
    }
    

    to

    while (i < 14 && (c = getchar()) != '\n')
    {
        s[i] = c;
        ++i;
    }
    s[i] = '\0';
    
  • Your specification is unclear as to whether you want your program to print the letters unique to msg, or to both s and msg. (i.e, do you want msg-s or (msg ∪ s)-(msg ∩ s) Assuming the first, the important part of your program goes like this:

    k=0;
    for(i=0;i<strlen(msg);i++){
        int exists = 0;
        for(j=0;!exists && j<strlen(s);j++){
            if(msg[j] == s[i])
                exists = 1;
        }
        if(!exists)
            msg[k++] = msg[i];
    }
    s[k] = '\0';
    

    The inner loop checks if s contains the current character in msg. If it does, we don't do anything, but if it doesn't, we append it to the end of a sublist we're creating on top of the bits of msg we've already processed.

share|improve this answer

your code is a mess even after the rewrite - there are too many errors to describe in detail

/*
blackbery
b l u e b e r r y
. . a c k b e . .
result = non-equal
*/
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main(void) {
const char msg[15] = "blueberry";
int c, s[15], i,j,k, ok;

for (i=0; i < 15; i++) s[i] = 0;
for (i=0; i < 15 && (c = getchar()) != '\n'; i++) s[i] = c;

for (ok=1, k=0; msg[k] != '\0'; ++k)
    if (s[k] != msg[k]) ok = 0; else s[k] = '.';

for (j = 0; j < 15; ++j) printf ("%c ", msg[j]);
printf("\n");

for (j = 0; j < 15; ++j) printf ("%c ", s[j]);
printf("\nresult = %s\n", ok ? "equal" : "non-equal");
}
share|improve this answer
    
So what is the actual answer you are proposing? –  JeremyP Dec 29 '11 at 9:24
    
Cleanup of original code that had been intended by the poster. From my point of view the "levenstein distance" is the more appropriate for the goal of comparing two strings. (I mean the author of original post wanted to display the difference between the strings, IMHO). –  Vlad Dec 29 '11 at 9:28
1  
yes I agree he did but all you have done is post a bit of code with no explanation. –  JeremyP Dec 29 '11 at 9:33

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