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I have a table called crewWork as follows :

CREATE TABLE crewWork( 
       FloorNumber int, AptNumber int, WorkType int, simTime int )

After the table was populated, I need to know how many times a change in apt occurred and how many times a change in floor occurred. Usually I expect to find 10 rows on each apt and 40-50 on each floor. I could just write a scalar function for that, but I was wondering if there's any way to do that in t-SQL without having to write scalar functions.

Thanks

The data will look like this:

FloorNumber  AptNumber    WorkType      simTime  
1            1            12            10  
1            1            12            25  
1            1            13            35  
1            1            13            47  
1            2            12            52  
1            2            12            59  
1            2            13            68  
1            1            14            75  
1            4            12            79  
1            4            12            89  
1            4            13            92  
1            4            14            105  
1            3            12            115  
1            3            13            129  
1            3            14            138  
2            1            12            142  
2            1            12            150  
2            1            14            168  
2            1            14            171  
2            3            12            180  
2            3            13            190  
2            3            13            200  
2            3            14            205  
3            3            14            216  
3            4            12            228  
3            4            12            231  
3            4            14            249  
3            4            13            260  
3            1            12            280  
3            1            13            295  
2            1            14            315  
2            2            12            328  
2            2            14            346  

I need the information for a report, I don't need to store it anywhere.

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Can you add sample data, input and output please? –  gbn Dec 29 '11 at 9:59
1  
How is a change represented? As a new row? (If you aren't storing it somewhere not sure how you expect scalar functions to help...) –  Martin Smith Dec 29 '11 at 10:00
    
    
@LukasEder: probably not a duplicate, yet... –  gbn Dec 29 '11 at 10:07
1  
@b3bel: please update the question,don't add as a comment... –  gbn Dec 29 '11 at 10:11

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If I am not missing anything, you could use the following method to find the number of changes:

  • determine groups of consequent rows with identical values;

  • count those groups;

  • subtract 1.

Apply the method individually for AptNumber and for FloorNumber.

The groups could be determined like in this answer, only there's isn't a Seq column in your case. Instead, another ROW_NUMBER() expression could be used. Here's an approximate solution:

;
WITH marked AS (
  SELECT
    FloorGroup = ROW_NUMBER() OVER (                         ORDER BY simTime)
               - ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY FloorNumber ORDER BY simTime),

    AptGroup   = ROW_NUMBER() OVER (                         ORDER BY simTime)
               - ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY AptNumber   ORDER BY simTime)
  FROM crewWork
)
SELECT
  FloorChanges = COUNT(DISTINCT FloorGroup) - 1,
  AptChanges   = COUNT(DISTINCT AprGroup)   - 1
FROM marked

(I'm assuming here that the simTime column defines the timeline of changes.)


UPDATE

Below is a table that shows how the distinct groups are obtained for AptNumber.

AptNumber  RN  RN_Apt  Apt_Group (= RN - RN_Apt)
---------  --  ------  ---------
1          1   1       0
1          2   2       0
1          3   3       0
1          4   4       0
2          5   1       4
2          6   2       4
2          7   3       4
1          8   5   =>  3
4          9   1       8
4          10  2       8
4          11  3       8
4          12  4       8
3          13  1       12
3          14  2       12
3          15  3       12
1          16  6       10
…          …   …       …

Here RN is a pseudo-column that stands for ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY simTime). You can see that this is just a sequence of rankings starting from 1.

Another pseudo-column, RN_Apt contains values produces by the other ROW_NUMBER, namely ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY AptNumber ORDER BY simTime). It contains rankings within individual groups of identical AptNumber values. You can see that, for a newly encountered value, the sequence starts over, and for a recurring one, it continues where it stopped last time.

You can also see from the table that if we subtract RN from RN_Apt (could be the other way round, doesn't matter in this situation), we get the value that uniquely identifies every distinct group of same AptNumber values. You might as well call that value a group ID.

So, now that we've got these IDs, it only remains for us to count them (count distinct values, of course). That will be the number of groups, and the number of changes is one less (assuming the first group is not counted as a change).

share|improve this answer
    
can you elaborate on how you get the AptGroup, for instance? –  b3bel Dec 29 '11 at 14:50
    
AptGroup should take into consideration the floor as well, as Apartment #1 on floor #1 is different that Apartment #1 on floor #2 –  Gaby aka G. Petrioli Dec 29 '11 at 15:29
    
@b3bel: Updated my answer. –  Andriy M Dec 29 '11 at 15:35
    
@Gaby aka G. Petrioli: Actually, I might have got things wrong to a greater extent than that. After your comment I re-read the question, and it now seems to me that I'm counting entirely wrong things here... (Thank you, by the way!) –  Andriy M Dec 29 '11 at 15:40
    
@AndriyM your approach works great. I've taken Gaby aka G. Petroli into consideration and change the table from apt number to aptID, since each apt has its ID independent of which floor it is in. Thanks. –  b3bel Jan 4 '12 at 11:14

add an extra column changecount

CREATE TABLE crewWork( 
       FloorNumber int, AptNumber int, WorkType int, simTime int ,changecount int)

increment changecount value for each updation

if want to know count for each field then add columns corresponding to it for changecount

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Assuming that each record represents a different change, you can find changes per floor by:

select FloorNumber, count(*)
from crewWork
group by FloorNumber

And changes per apartment (assuming AptNumber uniquely identifies apartment) by:

select AptNumber, count(*)
from crewWork
group by AptNumber

Or (assuming AptNumber and FloorNumber together uniquely identifies apartment) by:

select FloorNumber, AptNumber, count(*)
from crewWork
group by FloorNumber, AptNumber
share|improve this answer

You should check this out, it's an awesome way to get started on triggers: http://www.sqltutorials.net/intro-to-sql/tutorial-on-sql-server-triggers.html

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