Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to use BeautifulSoup to parse a list of addresses on a page. When I get to a tag with text and embedded tags, how do I only grab text from the tag without getting text in any further (lower level) embedded text at all?

I use a pTag to go from location to location in the .html page and here's the code I deal with:

Python command line, I type: >>> pTag.address

and receive the following portion of page code:

<address>
                Some street address<br />City, State and ZIP<br />
<div class="phone">
                    (123) 456-7890
                </div>
</address>

So to grab the phone, I type pTag.address.div.text and can easily get it. I'd like to get the address text that is not nested in another tag. I could do a re.compile with edge cases in case there is no phone info but I was hoping for something a tad more elegant.

Basically this is what I want, even better with out the br tags:

Some street address<br />City, State and ZIP<br />
share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It is possible to remove elements using the extract method:

>>> from BeautifulSoup import BeautifulSoup
>>> s = '<html><address>Some street address<br />City, State and ZIP<br /><div class="phone">(123) 456-7890</div></address></html>'
>>> soup = BeautifulSoup(s)
>>> soup.address.div.extract()
<div class="phone">(123) 456-7890</div>
>>> [e.extract() for e in soup.address.findAll('br')]
[<br />, <br />]
>>> soup.address.text
u'Some street addressCity, State and ZIP'
share|improve this answer
    
Awesome -- I think I'll prolly go with this if there isn't an even more magical way of "grabbing the first line of text". :) –  binarysolo Dec 29 '11 at 11:13

This feels like it should be easier to do, but the best I could come up with was:

>>> from BeautifulSoup import BeautifulSoup, NavigableString
>>> html = """
... <html><head></head><body>
... <address>
...                 Some street address<br />City, State and ZIP<br />
... <div class="phone">
...                     (123) 456-7890
...                 </div>
... </address>
... </body></html>
... """
>>> soup = BeautifulSoup(html)
>>> tag = soup.find('address')
>>> ' '.join(item for item in tag.contents
...          if isinstance(item, NavigableString)).strip()
u'Some street address City, State and ZIP'

EDIT

Here's an alternative solution using lxml:

>>> from lxml import etree
>>> tree = etree.HTML(html)
>>> tag = tree.xpath('//address')[0]
>>> ' '.join(tag.xpath('./text()')).strip()
'Some street address City, State and ZIP'
share|improve this answer
    
I know huh... I was feeling the same way re: "more elegant method must exist" but couldn't think of anything. This is quite good already tbh, and NavigableStrings is a nice touch. –  binarysolo Dec 29 '11 at 23:50

I don't think its possible with only BeautifulSoup, rather you can remove the unwanted text(div class="phone" tag content) from the whole text. It can be easily achieved through -

s = '<html><address>Some street address<br />City, State and ZIP<br /><div class="phone">(123) 456-7890</div></address></html>'
soup = BeautifulSoup(s)
s1 = soup.address.text                 // whole text
s2 = soup.address.div.text             // unwanted text
pos = string.find(s1, s2)
s1 = s1[:pos]                          // removing unwanted text
print s1
share|improve this answer
    
Yeah I was hoping not to set up multiple strings but thanks for the super quick response! –  binarysolo Dec 29 '11 at 11:12

If you're interested in trying PyQuery, here's another way to do it:

from pyquery import PyQuery
s = '<html><address>Some street address<br />City, State and ZIP<br /><div class="phone">(123) 456-7890</div></address></html>'
d = pyquery.PyQuery(s)
print d('address').text()
# 'Some street address City, State and ZIP (123) 456-7890'
print d('address').remove('*').text()
# 'Some street address City, State and ZIP'

This removes all child elements from address before extracting the text content.

share|improve this answer
    
This is kinda cool and a lot more elegant actually, though it does require another library... –  binarysolo Dec 29 '11 at 23:48

With regex, it's fast and a complete exctraction is possible with ease:

import re

ss = '''a line
another line
<address>
    Some street address<br />City, State and ZIP<br />
    <div class="phone">
        (123) 456-7890
    </div>
    <glomo>
        Hello glomo
    </glomo>
</address>
end of text'''


def analyze(ss,tag,regx = re.compile('<([^ ]+)([^>]*)>(.*?)</\\1>',re.DOTALL)):
    extract = re.search('<(%s)[^>]*>(.*?)</\\1>' % tag,ss,re.DOTALL).group(2)
    li = []
    def trt(m):
        li.append((m.group(1),m.group(2),m.group(3).strip(' \t\r\n')))
    li.append(('','',regx.sub(trt,extract).strip('\r\n\t ')))
    return li

resu = analyze(ss,'address')
for el in  resu:
    print el

print
print resu[-1][2]

result

('div', ' class="phone"', '(123) 456-7890')
('glomo', '', 'Hello glomo')
('', '', 'Some street address<br />City, State and ZIP<br />')

Some street address<br />City, State and ZIP<br />

Or puting the results in a dictionary:

def analyze(ss,tag,regx = re.compile('<([^ ]+)([^>]*)>(.*?)</\\1>',re.DOTALL)):
    extract = re.search('<(%s)[^>]*>(.*?)</\\1>' % tag,ss,re.DOTALL).group(2)
    di = {}
    def trt(m):
        di[m.group(1)] = (m.group(2),m.group(3).strip(' \t\r\n'))
    di[''] = ('',regx.sub(trt,extract).strip('\r\n\t '))
    return di

disu = analyze(ss,'address')
print "disu[''] ==",disu['']
print "disu['div'] ==",disu['div']
print (disu[x][1] for x in disu if 'phone' in disu[x][0]).next()

result

disu[''] == ('', 'Some street address<br />City, State and ZIP<br />')
disu['div'] == (' class="phone"', '(123) 456-7890')
(123) 456-7890

The functions return nothing (or rather it returns None) then regx.sub(trt,extract) replaces tags founs in extract with "", it remains only the text in the tag examined.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah I considered different approaches, especially with a dictionary (since I could just save the entire dictionary at the end) -- I guess I was hoping BeautifulSoup would've provided an elegant, 3-4 line solution. –  binarysolo Dec 30 '11 at 11:04
    
@binarysolo Note that re is built-in and faster than BeautifulSoup and very faster than lxml –  eyquem Dec 30 '11 at 14:54
    
Yeah I realize that -- I guess I was going for simple code elegance over speed (since I work in an environment that prefers that) and as noted I'm basically avoiding re.compile just for that. I understand that BeautifulSoup and lxml are both a bit slow and clunky... just the nature of the beast. –  binarysolo Dec 30 '11 at 21:35

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.