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What's the best method to get the index of an array which contains objects?

Imagine this scenario:

var hello = {
    hello: 'world',
    foo: 'bar'
};
var qaz = {
    hello: 'stevie',
    foo: 'baz'
}

var myArray = [];
myArray.push(hello,qaz);

Now I would like to have the indexOf the object which hello property is 'stevie' which, in this example, would be 1.

I'm pretty newbie with JavaScript and I don't know if there is a simple method or if I should build my own function to do that.

share|improve this question
1  
Do you want to merge the two objects hello and qaz? –  Armin Dec 29 '11 at 13:01
    
Nope I don't. I want to have a list of objects in an array. –  Antonio Laguna Dec 29 '11 at 13:05
    
Ah okay! You want to know the position of the whole object in the array, which has a defined property. –  Armin Dec 29 '11 at 13:06
    
Yes, exactly :-) –  Antonio Laguna Dec 29 '11 at 13:06

11 Answers 11

up vote 54 down vote accepted

There's not really a concise way, but here's a common solution:

var searchTerm = "stevie",
    index = -1;
for(var i = 0, len = myArray.length; i < len; i++) {
    if (myArray[i].hello === searchTerm) {
        index = i;
        break;
    }
}

or as a function:

function arrayObjectIndexOf(myArray, searchTerm, property) {
    for(var i = 0, len = myArray.length; i < len; i++) {
        if (myArray[i][property] === searchTerm) return i;
    }
    return -1;
}
arrayObjectIndexOf(arr, "stevie", "hello"); // 1

Just some notes:

  1. Don't use for...in loops on arrays
  2. Be sure to break out of the loop or return out of the function once you've found your "needle"
  3. Be careful with object equality

For example,

var a = {obj: 0};
var b = [a];
b.indexOf({obj: 0}); // -1 not found
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, the function is great. –  Antonio Laguna Dec 29 '11 at 13:19
    
the function has the searchterm comparation wrong as it should be searchTerm :) –  Antonio Laguna Dec 29 '11 at 14:50
    
Updated, sorry about that. –  Joe Dec 29 '11 at 15:07
    
still not udpated –  john Smith Feb 26 at 20:35
    
there were multiple occurences –  Joe Feb 27 at 21:06

I think you can solve it in one line using 'map' function:

pos = myArray.map(function(e) { return e.hello; }).indexOf('stevie');
share|improve this answer
7  
This should honestly be the accepted answer. Most browsers nowadays support Array.prototype.map() –  Dropped.on.Caprica Jun 27 '13 at 21:06
3  
It's not supported by IE8 but, if that's not a problem, this is the best solution. –  Antonio Laguna Nov 22 '13 at 11:56
    
This is without a doubt the best answer in 2014. Array.prototype.map() is supported through IE9 now. developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/… –  rjhilgefort Mar 14 at 0:59
1  
Answeru wa totemo oishi desu yo! –  Unferth May 20 at 11:16
1  
@Unferth Is your comment in Japanese? –  Pablo Francisco Pérez Hidalgo Jul 8 at 12:35

I like Pablo's answer, but Array#indexOf and Array#map don't work on all browsers. Underscore will use native code if it's available, but has fallbacks as well. Plus it has the pluck method for doing exactly what Pablo's anonymous map method does.

var idx = _.chain(myArray).pluck("hello").indexOf("Stevie").value();
share|improve this answer
    
Array.prototype.map() is soported for IE9+ and you can use a Polyfill for IE8, 7, 6: developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/… –  Johann Echavarria Sep 30 at 15:02
    
You could use a polyfill . . . or you could just use underscore or lodash, which are basically polyfills that have a whole bunch of other goodies attached. What's the objection with underscore? Size? –  tandrewnichols Oct 1 at 11:45
    
I really like Underscore, your answer is clever too, but IMHO Pablo's answer is the cleanest. –  Johann Echavarria Oct 2 at 5:35
    
It seems 118 other people agree with you. :) –  tandrewnichols Oct 2 at 11:39

Or prototype it :

Array.prototype.indexOf = function arrayObjectIndexOf(property, value) {
    for (var i = 0, len = this.length; i < len; i++) {
        if (this[i][property] === value) return i;
    }
    return -1;
}

myArr.indexOf("name", "stevie");

share|improve this answer
5  
Very convenient! Although I would choose prototype.indexOfObject so as not to interfere with the exisitng Array.indexOf method. Array.prototype.indexOfObject = function(property, value) { for (var i = 0, len = this.length; i < len; i++) { if (this[i][property] === value) return i; } return -1; }; –  Adam Oct 30 '13 at 11:42
    
I would wrap it in a self executing closure with the old being stored beforehand, with the first line of the replacement function being something along the lines of if (typeof property === 'string' || typeof property === 'number' || typeof property === 'boolean') return oldIndexOf(property, value);. This is because these are the few types that are immutable. I would also feature a third argument to enable fallback to the native method if needed. –  impinball May 27 at 4:52
var idx = myArray.reduce( function( cur, val, index ){

    if( val.hello === "stevie" && cur === -1 ) {
        return index;
    }
    return cur;

}, -1 );
share|improve this answer
1  
Pretty neat solution :) –  Antonio Laguna Dec 29 '11 at 13:18
    
Very elegant and generalizes easily for complex objects or nested arrays. –  mor Sep 16 '13 at 16:34

See this example: http://jsfiddle.net/89C54/

for (i = 0; i < myArray.length; i++) {
    if (myArray[i].hello === 'stevie') {
        alert('position: ' + i);
        return;
    }
}

It starts to count with zero.

share|improve this answer
array.filter(function(item, indx, arr){ return(item.hello === 'stevie'); })[0];

Mind the [0].

It is proper to use reduce as in Antonio Laguna's answer.

Apologies for the brevity...

share|improve this answer

You can create your own prototype to do this:

something like:

Array.prototype.indexOfObject = function (object) {
    for (var i = 0; i < this.length; i++) {
        if (JSON.stringify(this[i]) === JSON.stringify(object))
            return i;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Bad practice, breaking encapsulation: developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Guide/… –  HMR Apr 17 at 23:27

I have made a generic function to check the below is the code

function indexOfExt(list, item) {
    var len = list.length;

    for (var i = 0; i < len; i++) {
        var keys = Object.keys(list[i]);
        var flg = true;
        for (var j = 0; j < keys.length; j++) {
            var value = list[i][keys[j]];
            if (item[keys[j]] !== value) {
                flg = false;
            }
        }
        if (flg == true) {
            return i;
        }
    }
    return -1;
}

var items = [{ "hello": 'world', "foo": 'bar' }];
var selectedItem = { "hello": 'world', "foo": 'bar' };
alert(items.indexOf(selectedItem));
alert(indexOfExt(items, selectedItem));

The first alert will return -1 & second alert will return 0

share|improve this answer

Brief

myArray.indexOf('stevie','hello')

Use Cases :

  /*****NORMAL****/  
[2,4,5].indexOf(4) ;//OUTPUT 1
 /****COMPLEX*****/
 [{slm:2},{slm:4},{slm:5}].indexOf(4,'slm');//OUTPUT 1
 //OR
 [{slm:2},{slm:4},{slm:5}].indexOf(4,function(e,i){
   return e.slm;
});//OUTPUT 1
/***MORE Complex**/
[{slm:{salat:2}},{slm:{salat:4}},{slm:{salat:5}}].indexOf(4,function(e,i){
   return e.slm.salat;
});//OUTPUT 1

API :

    Array.prototype.indexOfOld=Array.prototype.indexOf

    Array.prototype.indexOf=function(e,fn){
      if(!fn){return this.indexOfOld(e)}
      else{ 
       if(typeof fn ==='string'){var att=fn;fn=function(e){return e[att];}}
        return this.map(fn).indexOfOld(e);
      }
    };
share|improve this answer

I will prefer to use findIndex() method:

 var index = myArray.findIndex('hello','stevie');

index will give you the index number.

share|improve this answer
1  
Answer , Spellings and Code indentation and :) are wrong? –  Sachin Verma Feb 4 at 6:16
    
findIndex is not in any javascript standard implementation. There is an upcoming (ecma 6) proposal for such a method, but its signature is not like that. Please, clarify what you mean (maybe the name of the method), give the findIndex method declaration or name the library you are using. –  Sebastien F. Mar 22 at 18:19

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