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I want to split a string by white spaces except if the text inside the string is in double quotes ("text") or single quotes ('text').

I am doing it with this function:

public static string[] ParseKeywordExpression(string keywordExpressionValue, bool isUniqueKeywordReq)
{
    keywordExpressionValue = keywordExpressionValue.Trim();
    if (keywordExpressionValue == null || !(keywordExpressionValue.Length > 0))
        return new string[0];
    int idx = keywordExpressionValue.Trim().IndexOf(" ");
    if (idx == -1)
        return new string[] { keywordExpressionValue };
    //idx = idx + 1;
    int count = keywordExpressionValue.Length;
    ArrayList extractedList = new ArrayList();
    while (count > 0)
    {
        if (keywordExpressionValue[0] == '"')
        {
            int temp = keywordExpressionValue.IndexOf(BACKSLASH, 1, keywordExpressionValue.Length - 1);
            while (keywordExpressionValue[temp - 1] == '\\')
            {
                temp = keywordExpressionValue.IndexOf(BACKSLASH, temp + 1, keywordExpressionValue.Length - temp - 1);
            }
            idx = temp + 1;
        }
        if (keywordExpressionValue[0] == '\'')
        {
            int temp = keywordExpressionValue.IndexOf(BACKSHASH_QUOTE, 1, keywordExpressionValue.Length - 1);
            while (keywordExpressionValue[temp - 1] == '\\')
            {
                temp = keywordExpressionValue.IndexOf(BACKSHASH_QUOTE, temp + 1, keywordExpressionValue.Length - temp - 1);
            }
            idx = temp + 1;
        }
        string s = keywordExpressionValue.Substring(0, idx);
        int left = count - idx;
        keywordExpressionValue = keywordExpressionValue.Substring(idx, left).Trim();
        if (isUniqueKeywordReq)                    
        {
            if (!extractedList.Contains(s.Trim('"')))
            {
                extractedList.Add(s.Trim('"'));
            }
        }
        else
        {
            extractedList.Add(s.Trim('"'));
        }
        count = keywordExpressionValue.Length;
        idx = keywordExpressionValue.IndexOf(SPACE);
        if (idx == -1)
        {
            string add = keywordExpressionValue.Trim('"', ' ');
            if (add.Length > 0)
            {
                if (isUniqueKeywordReq )
                {
                    if (!extractedList.Contains(add))
                    {
                        extractedList.Add(add);
                    }
                }
                else
                {
                    extractedList.Add(add);
                }
            }                   
            break;
        }
    }
    return (string[])extractedList.ToArray(typeof(string));
}

Is there any other way to do it or can this function can be optimised?

For example, I wish to split the string

%ABC% %aasdf% aalasdjjfas "c:\Document and Setting\Program Files\abc.exe"

to

%ABC%
%aasdf%
aalasdjjfas
"c:\Document and Setting\Program Files\abc.exe"

share|improve this question
    
So find a CSV regex and accommodate it to use \s instead of a comma? –  Brad Christie Dec 29 '11 at 13:37
    
@BradChristie i have edited my quiestion on how i wish the output. I dont thinl CSV REGEX would help –  Ankesh Dave Dec 29 '11 at 13:47
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The very simplest regex for this, handling single and double quotes:

("((\\")|([^"]))*")|('((\\')|([^']))*')|(\S+)

var regex = new Regex(@"(""((\\"")|([^""]))*"")|('((\\')|([^']))*')|(\S+)");
var matches = regex.Matches(inputstring);
foreach (Match match in matches) {
    extractedList.Add(match.Value);
}

So basically four to five lines of code is enough.

The expression, explained:

Main structure:
("((\\")|([^"]))*")    Double-quoted token
|                      , or
('((\\')|([^']))*')    single-quoted token
|                      , or
(\S+)                  any group of non-space characters

Double-quoted token:
(                      Group starts
    "                  Initial double-quote
    (                  Inner group starts
        (\\")          Either a backslash followed by a double-quote
        |              , or  
        ([^"])         any non-double-quote character
    )*                 The inner group repeats any number of times (or zero)
    "                  Ending double-quote
)

Single-quoted token:
(                      Group starts
    '                  Initial single-quote
    (                  Inner group starts
        (\\')          Either a backslash followed by a single-quote
        |              , or  
        ([^'])         any non-single-quote character
    )*                 The inner group repeats any number of times (or zero)
    '                  Ending single-quote
)

Non-space characters:
(                      Group starts
    \S                 Non-white-space character
    +                  , repeated at least once
)                      Group ends
share|improve this answer
    
Yes its working on double quotes but not on SINGLE QUOTES ex- %ABC% %aasdf% aalasdjjfas "c:\Doctment and Setting\Program Files\abc.exe" 'c:\Doctment and Setting\Program Files\abc.exe' –  Ankesh Dave Dec 29 '11 at 14:01
    
Updated my answer to also include single quotes. –  atornblad Dec 29 '11 at 14:31
    
Your Regex is working nice... :). Thanks :) –  Ankesh Dave Dec 30 '11 at 6:18
add comment

If you don't like RegEx, this method should be able to split quoted strings, and ignores consecutive spaces:

public IEnumerable<string> SplitString(string input)
{
    var isInDoubleQuote = false;
    var isInSingleQuote = false;
    var sb = new StringBuilder();
    foreach (var c in input)
    {
        if (!isInDoubleQuote && c == '"')
        {
            isInDoubleQuote = true;
            sb.Append(c);
        }
        else if (isInDoubleQuote)
        {
            sb.Append(c);
            if (c != '"')
                continue;
            if (sb.Length > 2)
                yield return sb.ToString();
            sb = sb.Clear();
            isInDoubleQuote = false;
        }
        else if (!isInSingleQuote && c == '\'')
        {
            isInSingleQuote = true;
            sb.Append(c);
        }
        else if (isInSingleQuote)
        {
            sb.Append(c);
            if (c != '\'')
                continue;
            if (sb.Length > 2)
                yield return sb.ToString();
            sb = sb.Clear();
            isInSingleQuote = false;
        }
        else if (c == ' ')
        {
            if (sb.Length == 0)
                continue;
            yield return sb.ToString();
            sb.Clear();
        }
        else
            sb.Append(c);
    }
    if (sb.Length > 0)
        yield return sb.ToString();
}

Edit: Changed return type to IEnumerable, using yield and StringBuilder

share|improve this answer
    
That will produce a rather lot of GC'able temporary strings, won't it? –  Lasse V. Karlsen Dec 29 '11 at 17:02
1  
If you aren't going to hit the results more than once, but will just foreach through them, then changing the return type to IEumerable<string> and replacing the output.Add calls with yield return curentString; is a good idea. It's also a case where using StringBuilder rather than lots of concatenations makes sense. –  Jon Hanna Dec 29 '11 at 17:06
    
I completely agree, @JonHanna. yield return is an under-used feature of C#. The StringBuilder argument is valid, but since it's probably only used for parsing a command line argument sequence, the performance hit isn't huge. But nevertheless, there's no excuse for sloppy code. –  atornblad Dec 29 '11 at 18:17
    
@JonHanna yeild return what does it exactly do... sorry i dont know much of these performance related stuff –  Ankesh Dave Dec 30 '11 at 6:33
1  
@adcool2007 Try it and see. yield return returns the result to the code that is foreaching through it, and then continues to the next bit of work. What really happens is the code is compiled into a method that returns a hidden anonymous class that implements IEnumerable<string> with your method being used to create the constructor, Current, Dispose (if you had a using block in your code) and most of all MoveNext... –  Jon Hanna Dec 30 '11 at 11:57
show 7 more comments

I escape the single and double quotes by \x27 and \x22 which makes the C# literal text of the pattern easier to read and process before sending to the regex parser. Because I am using IgnorePatternWhitespace for the regex parser it allows me to comment the pattern for better readability. HTH

string data = @"'single' %ABC% %aasdf% aalasdjjfas ""c:\Document and Setting\Program Files\abc.exe""";

string pattern = @"(?xm)     # Tell the regex compiler we are commenting (x = IgnorePatternWhitespace)
                             # and tell the compiler this is multiline (m),
                             # In Multiline the ^ matches each start line and $ is each EOL
                             # -Pattern Start-
^(                           # Start at the beginning of the line always
 (?![\r\n]|$)                # Stop the match if EOL or EOF found.
 (?([\x27\x22])              # Regex If to check for single/double quotes
      (?:[\x27\x22])         # \\x27\\x22 are single/double quotes
      (?<Token>[^\x27\x22]+) # Match this in the quotes and place in Named match Token
      (?:[\x27\x22])

  |                          # or (else) part of If when Not within quotes

     (?<Token>[^\s\r\n]+)    # Not within quotes, but put it in the Token match group
  )                          # End of Pattern OR

(?:\s?)                       # Either a space or EOL/EOF
)+                            # 1 or more tokens of data.
";

Console.WriteLine( string.Join(" | ", 

Regex.Match(data, pattern)
        .Groups["Token"]
        .Captures
        .OfType<Capture>()
        .Select( cp => cp.Value )
                )
                );
/* Output
single | %ABC% | %aasdf% | aalasdjjfas | c:\Document and Setting\Program Files\abc.exe
 */

The above is based on the following two blog entries I've written:

share|improve this answer
1  
I am glad you found your answer. I am a strong believer in regex and if people would take the time to learn it, its a powerful tool which regardless of language (C#/Java/php) one can use it to the same effect throughout. :-) –  OmegaMan Dec 30 '11 at 8:34
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