Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I want to see if one string contains a keyword in a keyword list.

I have the following function:

def needfilter?(src)
    ["keyowrd_1","keyowrd_2","keyowrd_3","keyowrd_4","keyowrd_5"].each do |kw|
        return true if src.include?(kw)
    end
    false
end   

Can this code block be simplified in to one line sentence?

I know it can be simplified to:

def needfilter?(src)
    !["keyowrd_1","keyowrd_2","keyowrd_3","keyowrd_4","keyowrd_5"].select{|c| src.include?(c)}.empty?
end

But this approach is not so efficient if the keyword array list is very long.

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I was curious what's the fastest solution and I created a benchmark of all answers up to now.

I modified steenslag answer a bit. For tuning reasons I create the regexp only once not for each test.

require 'benchmark'
KEYWORDS = ["keyowrd_1","keyowrd_2","keyowrd_3","keyowrd_4","keyowrd_5"]
TESTSTRINGS = ['xx', 'xxx', "keyowrd_2"]

N = 10_000 #Number of Test loops

def needfilter_orig?(src)
    ["keyowrd_1","keyowrd_2","keyowrd_3","keyowrd_4","keyowrd_5"].each do |kw|
        return true if src.include?(kw)
    end
    false
end 
def needfilter_orig2?(src)
    !["keyowrd_1","keyowrd_2","keyowrd_3","keyowrd_4","keyowrd_5"].select{|c| src.include?(c)}.empty?
end
def needfilter_any?(src)
  ["keyowrd_1","keyowrd_2","keyowrd_3","keyowrd_4","keyowrd_5"].any? do |kw|
    src.include? kw
  end
end
def needfilter_regexp?(src)
  !!(src =~ Regexp.union(KEYWORDS))
end
def needfilter_regexp_init?(src)
  !!(src =~ $KEYWORDS_regexp)
end
def needfilter_split?(src)
  (src.split(/ /) & KEYWORDS).empty?
end

Benchmark.bmbm(10) {|b|

  b.report('orig') { N.times { TESTSTRINGS.each{|src| needfilter_orig?(src)} } }
  b.report('orig2') { N.times { TESTSTRINGS.each{|src| needfilter_orig2?(src) } } }
  b.report('any') { N.times { TESTSTRINGS.each{|src| needfilter_any?(src) } } }
  b.report('regexp') { N.times { TESTSTRINGS.each{|src| needfilter_regexp?(src) } } }
  b.report('regexp_init') { 
   $KEYWORDS_regexp = Regexp.union(KEYWORDS) # Initialize once
    N.times { TESTSTRINGS.each{|src| needfilter_regexp_init?(src) } }
  }
  b.report('split') { N.times { TESTSTRINGS.each{|src| needfilter_split?(src) } } }

} #Benchmark

Result:

Rehearsal -----------------------------------------------
orig          0.094000   0.000000   0.094000 (  0.093750)
orig2         0.093000   0.000000   0.093000 (  0.093750)
any           0.110000   0.000000   0.110000 (  0.109375)
regexp        0.578000   0.000000   0.578000 (  0.578125)
regexp_init   0.047000   0.000000   0.047000 (  0.046875)
split         0.125000   0.000000   0.125000 (  0.125000)
-------------------------------------- total: 1.047000sec

                  user     system      total        real
orig          0.078000   0.000000   0.078000 (  0.078125)
orig2         0.109000   0.000000   0.109000 (  0.109375)
any           0.078000   0.000000   0.078000 (  0.078125)
regexp        0.579000   0.000000   0.579000 (  0.578125)
regexp_init   0.046000   0.000000   0.046000 (  0.046875)
split         0.125000   0.000000   0.125000 (  0.125000)

The solution with regular expressions is the fastest, if you create the regexp only once.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you very much. – donnior Dec 30 '11 at 4:14

Looks like a nice use case for Enumerable#any? method:

def needfilter?(src)
  ["keyowrd_1","keyowrd_2","keyowrd_3","keyowrd_4","keyowrd_5"].any? do |kw|
    src.include? kw
  end
end
share|improve this answer
    
omg, I forggot the 'any?' function, thanks. – donnior Dec 29 '11 at 14:20
def need_filter?(src)
  !!(src =~ /keyowrd_1|keyowrd_2|keyowrd_3|keyowrd_4|keyowrd_5/)
end

The =~ method returns a fixnum or nil. The double bang converts that to a boolean.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks, but the keyword list maybe very large. – donnior Dec 29 '11 at 14:11
    
You can also build the regex with /#{keywords.join('|')}/ (assuming keywords don't include symbols). This is probably the fastest solution. But try to benchmark all answers. – Guilherme Bernal Dec 29 '11 at 14:23
    
thanks, works very well now. – donnior Dec 29 '11 at 14:35
2  
@LBg The best way is probably Regexp.union(keywords). – steenslag Dec 29 '11 at 15:24

This is the way I'd do it:

def needfilter?(src)
    keywords = Regexp.union("keyowrd_1","keyowrd_2","keyowrd_3","keyowrd_4","keyowrd_5")
    !!(src =~ keywords)
end

This solution has:

  • No iteration
  • Single regexp using Regexp.union

Should be fast for even a large set of keywords. Note that hardcoding the keywords in the method is not ideal, but I'm assuming that was just for the sake of the example.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, your approach is very nice. In my real code the keywords are from some extra configuration, here I just want to known which solution is better. – donnior Dec 30 '11 at 4:23
    
That's what I thought. You can save even more time by computing the union'ed keywords exactly once and storing the resulting regexp outside the method, such as in an attribute. Then your entire method definition is simply !!(src =~ @keywords). – Mark Thomas Dec 30 '11 at 14:31
    
Ruby's regex engine is fast too, so you don't take a hit when using big regex patterns. – the Tin Man Dec 31 '11 at 20:11

I think that

def need_filter?(src)
  (src.split(/ /) & ["keyowrd_1","keyowrd_2","keyowrd_3","keyowrd_4","keyowrd_5"]).empty?
end

will work as you expect (as it's described in Array include any value from another array?) and will be faster than any? and include?.

share|improve this answer
    
src is a string, according to the question. – steenslag Dec 29 '11 at 14:07
    
I've fixed it by splitting all string to words. – hauleth Dec 29 '11 at 14:14
    
thanks, but this approach failed, the src string may be very complex. And I think it's not so efficient, because I only want to know the string hit any keyword, if so, ignore the other keywords and just return true – donnior Dec 29 '11 at 14:18

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.