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I want to create simple utility class that has no visual elements and create it in XAML so I can define databindings. I tried to create class derived from DependencyObject and create it in Window.Resources section but it doesn't call any constructor.

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I've found dirty workaround for this problem - to place FindResource("myClass"); in main form constructor. –  Poma Dec 29 '11 at 14:36
    
Nice little hack :) –  BigL Dec 29 '11 at 14:49

3 Answers 3

You can instantiate your class in the app.xaml, just add your namespace to it with

xmlns:yourNamespace="clr-namespace...."

It is easy the intellisense helps.

And then in Application.Resources you create your class

<Application.Resources>
   <yourNamespace:YourClass x:Key="yourClassInstanteName" />      
</Application.Resources>

I hope this helps you.

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I did that. The problem is that class instance isn't created at run time (just try to drop breakpoint in constructor). –  Poma Dec 29 '11 at 14:17
3  
Looks like instances are created when you actually use them –  Poma Dec 29 '11 at 14:18
    
yes but your Bindings are using it so it should instantiate it –  BigL Dec 29 '11 at 14:47
    
Nope, it isn't instantiated even when binding sources are changed. I think bindings themselves aren't instantiated too. –  Poma Dec 29 '11 at 14:53
    
Could you share your XAML bindings, or one for example? Just curious because you use converters this way too and they work. You use StaticResource to bind? –  BigL Dec 29 '11 at 14:56
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Looks like instances are created when you actually use them. I've found dirty workaround for this problem - to place FindResource("myClass"); in main form constructor.

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I know i am posting on an old Question but i came across this while trying to find the answers myself. The code big L posted was indeed correct:

xmlns:yourNamespace="clr-namespace...."

Place a copy in the Application Resources:

<Application.Resources>
   <yourNamespace:YourClass x:Key="yourClassInstanteName" />      
</Application.Resources>

The additional key to this information is that the class needs to have a default constructor. So in the Class source you should have a method like so:

public yourClassName()
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