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I know that exponentiation is O(log n) or worse for most cases, but I'm getting lost trying to understand of how numbers are represented themselves. Take JavaScript, for example, because it has several native number formats:

100000 === 1E5 && 100000 === 0303240
>>> true

Internally, don't they all end up being stored and manipulated as binary values stored in memory? If so, is the machine able to store the decimal and scientific-notation representations as fast as it does the octal?

And thus, would you expect +("1E" + n) to be faster than Math.pow(10, n)?

Mostly this question is about how 1E(n) works, but in trying to think about the answer myself I became more curious about how the number is parsed and stored in the first place. I would appreciate any explanation you can offer.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

but I'm getting lost trying to understand of how numbers are represented themselves. Take JavaScript, for example, because it has several native number formats:

Internally, don't they all end up being stored and manipulated as binary values stored in memory?

Yep In javascript, there is only one number type a 64bit float type therefore

1 === 1.0 

http://www.hunlock.com/blogs/The_Complete_Javascript_Number_Reference

If so, is the machine able to store the decimal and scientific-notation representations as fast as it does the octal?

Yes again because there is only one type. (Maybe there is a minute difference but it should be negligible)

However, for this specific case there is a limit on the numbers that can be represented ~ 1e300, therefore the runtime is O(~300) = O(1) all other numbers are represented as +/- Infinity.

And thus, would you expect +("1E" + n) to be faster than Math.pow(10, n)?

Not quite! 1E100 is faster than Math.pow(10,n) However +("1E"+n) is slower than Math.pow(10,n); Not because of string and memory allocation, but because the JS interpreter has to parse the string and convert it into a number, and that is slower than the native Math.pow(num,num) operation.

jsperf test

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Thanks for the carefully laid out, well supported answer. –  kojiro Dec 29 '11 at 19:25

I don't think string manipulation could be faster, because at least concatenation creates a new object (memory allocation, more job for GC), Math.pow usually comes to single machine instruction.

Moreover, some modern JS VMs do hotspot optimisation, producing machine code from javascript. There is chance of it for Math.pow, but nearly impossible for the string magic.

If you 100% sure that Math.pow works slow in your application (I just cannot believe in it), you could use array lookup, it should work fastest possible: [1,10,100,1000,10000,...][n]. Array will be relatively small and complexity is O(1).

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Loved the array reach. [10^1, 10^2, ...] (i know ^ is not pow in JS) –  Tom Roggero Dec 29 '11 at 14:38
    
@TomRoggero Better [1e0, 1e1, 1e2, 1e3, ...] –  kan Dec 29 '11 at 14:55

I ran a jsperf on the options.

var sum = 0;
for (var i = 1; i < 20; ++i){
  sum += +("1E" + i);
}

is slow because of string concatenation.

var sum = 0;
for (var i = 0; i < 20; ++i){
  Math.pow(10, i);
}

is therefore faster, since it operates on numbers only.

var sum = 0;
sum += 1e0;
sum += 1e1;
...
sum += 1e19;

is fastest, but only likely since 1ex for a constant are precomputed values.

To get the best peformance, you might want to precompute the answers for yourself.

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Math.pow doesn't distinguish between numbers so it is just as slow for every number, provided that the interpreter doesn't optimize for integers. It is likely to allocate just a few floats to run. I am ignoring parsing time.

"1E"+n will allocate 2~3 string objects which might have quite a substantial memory overhead, destroy intermediates, and reparse it as a number. Unlikely to be faster than pow. I am again ignoring the parse time.

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