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Suppose: I have a single table that holds the book ID, student ID and date of every book checked out this year.

How can I count the number of books that each student has checked out?

I currently have +4000 students and +60000 check outs.

All this information is stored on a MySQL server AND I have a Open Office Calc table with this information. I also have ACCESS97 installed, so I guess I could use some VBA code to do this.

The only way I can think of doing this is making a gigantic LOOP statement with Access to count everything and copy whatever meets certain criteria.

But I'm pretty sure I can use some SQL commands via Access that would make this task a little bit faster.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try this SQL command in Access:

SELECT student_id, count(book_id) AS num_of_books
FROM myTable
GROUP BY student_id
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Awesome! Any tips on SQL functions I should know? The tutorials I read didn't touch this kind of thing, and I just realized that there are AVERAGE, COUN, MIM, MAX and other types of functions. –  Johnny Bigoode Dec 29 '11 at 14:50
1  
There are some tutorials you can check out. You can start here for instance: stackoverflow.com/questions/2322297/sql-language-tutorial –  juergen d Dec 29 '11 at 15:14
select 
  student_id, 
  count(distinct book_id) number_of_books
from 
  your_table
group by student_id
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Access says: 'syntax error on count(distinct book_id)' –  Johnny Bigoode Dec 29 '11 at 14:49
    
oh, that should work in mysql, not know in Access :). For Access you can remove distinct. That was for the case a student had read same book several times. –  Florin Ghita Dec 29 '11 at 14:51

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