Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am looking for an efficient way to translate my Ember object to a json string, to use it in a websocket message below

/*
 * Model
 */

App.node = Ember.Object.extend({
  name: 'theName',
  type: 'theType',
  value: 'theValue',
})

The websocket method:

App.io.emit('node', {node: hash}); 

hash should be the json representation of the node. {name: thename, type: theType, ..} There must be a fast onliner to do this.. I dont want to do it manualy since i have many attributes and they are likely to change..

share|improve this question

8 Answers 8

up vote 12 down vote accepted

As stated you can take inspiration from the ember-runtime/lib/core.js#inspect function to get the keys of an object, see http://jsfiddle.net/pangratz666/UUusD/

App.Jsonable = Ember.Mixin.create({
    getJson: function() {
        var v, ret = [];
        for (var key in this) {
            if (this.hasOwnProperty(key)) {
                v = this[key];
                if (v === 'toString') {
                    continue;
                } // ignore useless items
                if (Ember.typeOf(v) === 'function') {
                    continue;
                }
                ret.push(key);
            }
        }
        return this.getProperties.apply(this, ret);
    }
});

Note, since commit 1124005 - which is available in ember-latest.js and in the next release - you can pass the ret array directly to getProperties, so the return statement of the getJson function looks like this:

return this.getProperties(ret);
share|improve this answer
    
To get this working in IE8, I had to add another guardian if: if (key.indexOf('__ember') !== -1) { continue; } –  rallrall Apr 8 '13 at 14:18
1  
This doesn't seem to support nested hierarchies of Jsonables –  Kevin Pauli Apr 11 '13 at 19:43

You can get a plain JS object (or hash) from an Ember.Object instance by calling getProperties() with a list of keys.

If you want it as a string, you can use JSON.stringify().

For example:

var obj  = Ember.Object.create({firstName: 'Erik', lastName: 'Bryn', login: 'ebryn'}),
    hash = obj.getProperties('firstName', 'lastName'), // => {firstName: 'Erik', lastName: 'Bryn'}
    stringHash = JSON.stringify(hash); // => '{"firstName": "Erik", "lastName": "Bryn"}'
share|improve this answer
1  
What if you want to get all properties out of the Ember model? obj.getProperties() doesn't work. is there any easy way other than to list all properties. That would be tedious if there are too many properties in the model. –  Rajat Mar 16 '12 at 3:25
    
There isn't a way, other than using Object.keys to extract all the properties out of an Ember object. You have to know what properties you're using. –  ebryn Mar 21 '12 at 4:59
1  
You could take some inspiration from Ember.inspect, see github.com/emberjs/ember.js/blob/master/packages/ember-runtime/… –  pangratz Apr 17 '12 at 21:11

I modifed @pangratz solution slightly to make it handle nested hierarchies of Jsonables:

App.Jsonable = Ember.Mixin.create({
    getJson: function() {
        var v, json = {};
        for (var key in this) {
            if (this.hasOwnProperty(key)) {
                v = this[key];
                if (v === 'toString') {
                    continue;
                } 
                if (Ember.typeOf(v) === 'function') {
                    continue;
                }
                if (App.Jsonable.detect(v))
                    v = v.getJson();
                json[key] = v;
            }
        }
        return json;
    }
});
share|improve this answer

I have also been struggling with this. As Mirko says, if you pass the ember object to JSON.stringify you will get circular reference error. However if you store the object inside one property and use stringify on that object, it works, even nested subproperties.

var node = Ember.Object.create({
  data: {
    name: 'theName',
    type: 'theType',
    value: 'theValue'
  }
});

console.log(JSON.stringify(node.get('data')));

However, this only works in Chrome, Safari and Firefox. In IE8 I get a stack overflow so this isn't a viable solution.

I have resorted to creating JSON schemas over my object models and written a recursive function to iterate over the objects using the properties in the schemas and then construct pure Javascript objects which I can then stringify and send to my server. I also use the schemas for validation so this solution works pretty well for me but if you have very large and dynamic data models this isn't possible. I'm also interested in simpler ways to accomplish this.

share|improve this answer

Will this work for you?

var json = JSON.stringify( Ember.getMeta( App.node, 'values') );

The false is optional, but would be more performant if you do not intend to modify any of the properties, which is the case according to your question. This works for me, but I am wary that Ember.meta is a private method and may work differently or not even be available in future releases. (Although, it isn't immediately clear to me if Ember.getMeta() is private). You can view it in its latest source form here:

https://github.com/emberjs/ember.js/blob/master/packages/ember-metal/lib/utils.js

The values property contains only 'normal' properties. You can collect any cached, computed properties from Ember.meta( App.node, false ).cached. So, provided you use jQuery with your build, you can easily merge these two objects like so:

$.extend( {}, Ember.getMeta(App.node, 'values'), Ember.getMeta(App.node, 'cache') );

Sadly, I haven't found a way to get sub-structures like array properties in this manner.

share|improve this answer

I've written an extensive article on how you can convert ember models into native objects or JSON which may help you or others :)

http://pixelchild.com.au/post/44614363941/how-to-convert-ember-objects-to-json

share|improve this answer
    
this link doesn't work –  Kevin Pauli Apr 11 '13 at 19:27
    
Sites back up @KevinPauli - my DNS went down for a while annoyingly. –  byrons Apr 16 '13 at 0:21
    
ah ok. editing the post so I can undo my downvote. I must have been in a really bad mood that day, sorry –  Kevin Pauli Apr 17 '13 at 1:29
    
it is telling me I can't undo my downvote unless the anser is edited in some way. I submitted an edit but it hasn't been approved. If you'll edit it I will undo the downvote –  Kevin Pauli Apr 18 '13 at 21:59
    
@KevinPauli edited :) No dramas if you dont get to it, dosnt bother me. –  byrons Apr 23 '13 at 12:39

I modified @Kevin-pauli solution to make it works with arrays as well:

App.Jsonable = Ember.Mixin.create({
    getJson: function() {
        var v, json = {}, inspectArray = function (aSome) {
            if (Ember.typeof(aSome) === 'array') {
                return aSome.map(inspectArray);
            }
            if (Jsonable.detect(aSome)) {
                return aSome.getJson();
            } 
            return aSome;
        };
        for (var key in this) {
            if (this.hasOwnProperty(key)) {
                v = this[key];
                if (v === 'toString') {
                    continue;
                } 
                if (Ember.typeOf(v) === 'function') {
                    continue;
                }
                if (Ember.typeOf(v) === 'array') {
                    v = v.map(inspectArray);
                }
                if (App.Jsonable.detect(v))
                    v = v.getJson();
                json[key] = v;
            }
        }
        return json;
    }
});

I also made some further modification to get the best of both worlds. With the following version I check if the Jsonable object has a specific property that informs me on which of its properties should be serialized:

App.Jsonable = Ember.Mixin.create({
    getJson: function() {
        var v, json = {}, base, inspectArray = function (aSome) {
            if (Ember.typeof(aSome) === 'array') {
                return aSome.map(inspectArray);
            }
            if (Jsonable.detect(aSome)) {
                return aSome.getJson();
            } 
            return aSome;
        };
        if (!Ember.isNone(this.get('jsonProperties'))) {
            // the object has a selective list of properties to inspect
            base = this.getProperties(this.get('jsonProperties'));
        } else {
            // no list given: let's use all the properties
            base = this;
        }
        for (var key in base) {
            if (base.hasOwnProperty(key)) {
                v = base[key];
                if (v === 'toString') {
                    continue;
                } 
                if (Ember.typeOf(v) === 'function') {
                    continue;
                }
                if (Ember.typeOf(v) === 'array') {
                    v = v.map(inspectArray);
                }
                if (App.Jsonable.detect(v))
                    v = v.getJson();
                json[key] = v;
            }
        }
        return json;
    }
});

I am using this little tweak and I am happy with it. I hope it'll help others as well!

Thanks to @pangratz and @Kevin-Pauli for their solution!

share|improve this answer

Ember.js appears to have a JSON library available. I hopped into a console (Firebug) on one the Todos example and the following worked for me:

hash = { test:4 }
JSON.stringify(hash)

So you should be able to just change your line to

App.io.emit('node', { node:JSON.stringify(hash) })
share|improve this answer
2  
I think Stephan's challenge lies in obtaining the hash representation that can then be passed to JSON.stringify. Passing the actual Ember object doesn't work (I'm getting an error about circular structure). Digging through the Ember source, I haven't been able to find a built-in way to convert an Ember object to a hash, so you may need to implement this manually for your object. –  Mirko Froehlich Dec 30 '11 at 18:05
    
@MirkoFroehlich - Ah, gotcha. I guess I read it to hastily :-) –  Topher Fangio Jan 3 '12 at 13:53

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.