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I'm implementing a RESTfull API to talk to AWS RDS, security_groups resource supports the typical CRUD verbs. When it comes to "authorize" and "revoke" i'm not sure what's the best practice, which one do you think is best?

Custom action, params in url

PUT agifog:3000/rds/security_groups/:security_group/authorize?ec2name='default'&ec2owner='0123456789'

Custom action, passing params

PUT agifog:3000/rds/security_groups/:security_group/authorize
{
    "ec2name": "default"
    "ec2owner": "0123456789"
}

Standard update

PUT agifog:3000/rds/security_groups/:security_group
{
    "operation": "authorize"
    "ec2name": "default"
    "ec2owner": "0123456789"
}
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The second seems the most RESTful. You've got a resource (security group) and a custom action (authorize) that will respond to your request's verb (PUT).

PUT agifog:3000/rds/security_groups/:security_group/authorize
{
    "ec2name": "default"
    "ec2owner": "0123456789"
}

and similarly:

PUT agifog:3000/rds/security_groups/:security_group/revoke

(NOTE: I'd probably prefer a POST for the above if it will be generating a session or some other authentication data/token.)

For comparison, if you were interested in updating the attributes of that resource, you'd want to do something like:

PUT agifog:3000/rds/security_groups/:security_group
{
    "some_attr1": "some_val"
    "some_other_attr": "some_val"
}

In which case the PUT implies that it is an UPDATE to this resource.

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PUT does not mean "update" any more than POST means "insert". PUT means "put this here".

RESTful practises revolve around treating your URLs as resources, entities which have some meaning in your domain, which you perform actions against (the verb of the HTTP request).

What you could do is consider the security group to be the resource on which you are acting and PUT users into the group or DELETE them from the group:

PUT agifog:3000/rds/security_groups/:security_group/default
{
    "ec2owner": "0123456789"
}

DELETE agifog:3000/rds/security_groups/:security_group/default

These could then correspond to authorize and revoke actions, plus makes it easy to see how a GET on the group could produce a list of all the users currently in the group.

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Wouldn't it be more RESTful to GET users of the group with: GET host/rds/security_groups/:security_group/users ? Whereas a GET host/rds/security_groups/:security_group would just get the group's attributes? –  miked Dec 29 '11 at 18:59
    
I can see the benefits of this approach, for the purpose of simplicity i didn't say that aws rds authorize or revoke accepts two different set of params. 1 (ec2name and ec2owner) or 2 (cidr). for the second case, a cidr format would be problematic in a url (agifog:3000/rds/security_groups/:security_group/0.0.0.0/0). I can see it valid for other cases. –  Rodrigo Estebanez Dec 29 '11 at 20:10
    
@miked I think that depends entirely on what information is useful to present when requesting a resource. If there is lots of useful information about groups that isn't the user list, I'd agree that having a separate "leaf" for the users could be a better approach. Personally, I'd expect the GET on the group to include the member list, since it's probably the most important piece of information. –  Tragedian Dec 30 '11 at 9:35
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