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I'm looking to create what I feel is probably a basic JSON object, but my limited knowledge of JSON is making it difficult.

I am trying to create an object that will ultimately be passed to a .NET AMSX web service. The parameter for the web service is a P1Request object, which is defined as follows:

Public Class P1RequestClause
    Public Property FieldId() As Integer
    Public Property OperatorId() As Integer
    Public Property Value() As String
End Class

Public Class P1Request
    Public Property Fields() As String()
    Public Property Clauses() As P1RequestClause()
End Class

On the client side, I have a number of different form fields, the values of which I would like to wrap up in a JSON object to pass.

I am unsure of what structure my JSON object needs to match the .NET class.

Ideally my data, in psudocode, would look like:

    P1Request:
Fields:
    Field1,
    Field2,
    Field3
Clauses:
    P1RequestClause:
        Id1,
        OpId1,
        SomeValue
    P1RequestClause:
        Id2,
        Opid2,
        AnotherValue

What would this look like in JSON? It's the array of Fields in P1Request is the part that confuses me the most. As I understand JSON, it's all name:value pairs, and making an array of a single field is throwing me.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted
{
  "Fields": [
    "moo",
    "says",
    "the cow"
  ],
  "Clauses": [
    {
      "FieldId": 1,
      "OperatorId": 3,
      "Value": "foo"
    },
    {
      "FieldId": 2,
      "OperatorId": 0,
      "Value": "bar"
    }
  ]
}

JSON consists of primitive types (numbers, strings, null...), objects (which are key-value pair collections), and arrays, which is what you were missing.

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I appreciate the clarification, things make more sense now. Thanks! –  Adam H Dec 29 '11 at 16:10
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