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I recently tried to create a global header file which would have all definitions of error codes (i.e. NO_ERROR, SDL_SCREEN_FLIP_ERROR, etc.) these would just be integers which I would define here.

I included these in both of my .cpp files, however I am getting an error where it is stated that I am defining then twice.

globals.h:

#pragma once

// error related globals
int SCREEN_LOAD_ERROR = 1;
int NO_ERROR = 0;

main.cpp:

#include "globals.h"
#include "cTile.h"
/* rest of the code */

cTile.h:

#pragma once
#include "globals.h"

class cTile {
};

It is complaining that SCREEN_LOAD_ERROR and NO_ERROR are defined twice, but as far as I know #pragma once should prevent this (I also tried #ifndef, but this also did not work).

compiler output:

1>main.obj : error LNK2005: "int SCREEN_LOAD_ERROR" (?SCREEN_LOAD_ERROR@@3HA) already defined in cTile.obj 1>main.obj : error LNK2005: "int NO_ERROR" (?NO_ERROR@@3HA) already defined in cTile.obj

Am I missing something?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Do not declare variables inside your header file.
When you declare a variable in header file a copy of the variable gets created in each translation unit where you include the header file.

Solution is:
Declare them extern inside one of your header file and define them in exactly one of your cpp file.

globals.h:

extern int SCREEN_LOAD_ERROR;
extern int NO_ERROR;

globals.cpp:

#include "globals.h"
int SCREEN_LOAD_ERROR = 0;
int NO_ERROR = 0;

main.cpp:

#include "globals.h"

cTile.h:

#include "globals.h"
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Cheers, that was the issue. Didn't know I wasn't allowed to do this. –  Zilarion Dec 29 '11 at 15:52

You could simply use an enum:

globals.h:

enum
{
    SCREEN_LOAD_ERROR = 1,
    NO_ERROR = 0,
    // ...
}
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1  
Yup, this seems like the proper way to do it. –  Luchian Grigore Jan 7 '12 at 22:19

That's not compiler output, it is linker output. Look at it closer.

You should not define integer variables in your header files. When you do, every single cpp file which includes the header file redeclares them. And then the linker gets kind of upset.

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using #ifndef works fine.(Although it works, this is not best practice). try like this:

globals.h

#ifndef GLOBALS
#define GLOBALS

int SCREEN_LOAD_ERROR = 1;
int NO_ERROR = 0;

#endif

cTile.h:

#include "globals.h"

class cTile {
};

main.cpp:

#include "globals.h"
#include "cTile.h"
/* rest of the code */
share|improve this answer
    
This is wrong. Include guards are persistent per translation unit. If a different cpp includes the header, it will redefine the variables. The declaration should remain in the header and the definition should be moved in a single implementation file. –  Luchian Grigore Jan 7 '12 at 22:18

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