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I've come across some odd-looking Oracle syntax in one of our legacy apps and I'm intrigued...

The Query

(names have been altered to protect the innocent)

SELECT COUNT(1) AS WEEKLYCOUNT 
FROM MONKEYS MD
WHERE 
    MD.MID||'' IN 
    (
        SELECT DISTINCT MD.MID 
        FROM MONKEYS MD, GIRAFFES GD 
        WHERE 
            (MD.MID = GD.MID(+)||'') 
            AND CURRENT_STATUS = 'Healthy' 
            AND GIRAFFE_TYPE = 'Long-necked' 
            AND INTERESTING_DATE BETWEEN 
                '22 December 2011' AND '29 December 2011'
    ) 
HAVING COUNT(MD.MID) > 0

The bit I'm unsure about is the ||'' syntax. I've only ever seen || used for concatenation in Oracle, until now. And it just doesn't seem to make sense here...

Any ideas as to what this is doing, why it's doing it and how this syntax works would be great.

Some more info

Interestingly, this SQL returns the following in SQLPlus:

no rows selected

Elapsed: 00:00:00.03
SQL>

I re-wrote the same bit of SQL (minus the weird syntax), using my knowledge of the system to produce what I'm fairly sure is the same result:

SELECT COUNT(1) AS WEEKLYCOUNT 
FROM 
    MONKEYS MD 
    LEFT JOIN GIRAFFES GD ON GD.MID = MD.MID 
WHERE 
    AND MD.CURRENT_STATUS = 'Healthy'
    AND GD.GIRAFFE_TYPE = 'Long-necked'
    AND GD.INTERESTING_DATE BETWEEN 
        '22 December 2011' AND '29 December 2011' 

However, the second query produces the (expected) following:

WEEKLYCOUNT
-----------
          0

Elapsed: 00:00:00.16
SQL>

The primary difference being that, even though both queries are looking for a COUNT, the first one returns no rows... Weird, huh?

(PS to get the elapsed time to display, I have SET TIMING ON)

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2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

|| is used in Oracle to concatenate strings so, if you have a non string typed variable and you want to cast it to string, you can concatenate it with ''.

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So to clarify, this syntax is merely casting stuff as a string? Thanks for the quick response. –  LordScree Dec 29 '11 at 15:58
    
But why would you do that? Only thing I can think of is disabling the use of index on MD.MID. Do a explain plan with and without the ||'' and you'll probably see a full tables scan instead of a index range scan –  Robert Merkwürdigeliebe Dec 29 '11 at 16:15
    
@Robert: You'd want to do this so GD.MID is converted to a varchar2, rather than having MD.MID converted to a number (Oracle datatype precedence will convert strings to numbers by default when comparing values of disparate types). Obviously, this is only useful if MD.MID can contain non-numeric text in the first place. As an aside, if this is the reasoning, it would be far more readable to use to_char or cast. –  Allan Dec 29 '11 at 16:32
    
@Allen : clear answer. But still, what is the use of MD.MID||'' when comperaring it with an IN list of MD.MID? Only effect I see is the bypassing of index on MD.MID in the outer select. –  Robert Merkwürdigeliebe Dec 30 '11 at 8:59
1  
Just because it's in production code doesn't mean it makes sense ^^ –  LordScree Dec 30 '11 at 9:07

It's the having clause. Since COUNT(MD.MID) = 0 and HAVING COUNT(MD.MID) > 0 is false no records are displayed. Change it to HAVING COUNT(MD.MID) < 100 or remove it and the output will be

WEEKLYCOUNT
-----------
          0
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, you're quite right. The HAVING clause caused the behaviour with the results. –  LordScree Dec 30 '11 at 9:06

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