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I am implementing a class that will be used concurrently from multiple threads. Most of the properties get and set primitive types which can be handled properly by the Interlocked class. The class includes a Guid property. This is not as straight-forward to implement in a thread-safe manner. Is this how you would implement the property? Thanks in advance.

private Byte[] _activityId;
public Guid ActivityId 
    {
        get { return new Guid(this._activityId); }
        set
        {
            Byte[] bytes = value.ToByteArray();
            Interlocked.Exchange(ref this._activityId, bytes);
        }
    }

UPDATE: So the only proposed solution up to this point doesn't include the use of any "Threading" classes or constructs. So I am going to pose the question that I've already posed in comments:

My understanding is that reference/primitive values types assignments are atomic however Interlocked will guarantee the change is propagated to all threads. If we could simply just assign the value, why does Interlocked expose APIs to exchange reference types and primitive values?

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3  
Assignments of reference types are atomic; you don't need Interlocked. –  SLaks Dec 29 '11 at 16:19
    
It's very possible I'm missing something here, but since Guids are value types, what exactly is the issue here? –  David Lively Dec 29 '11 at 16:19
    
What's the point of having a byte[] backing property and a public Guid property? How is this code going to be used? –  Darin Dimitrov Dec 29 '11 at 16:22
    
@DarinDimitrov: It will be used as a Guid, but he wants atomic assigment. –  SLaks Dec 29 '11 at 16:22
    
My understanding is that reference assignments are atomic however Interlocked will guarantee the change is propagated to all threads. If we could simply just assign the value, why does Interlocked expose APIs to exchange reference types and primitive values? –  Josh Dec 29 '11 at 16:26
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think you could use the other overload of Interlocked.Exchange:

private volatile object _activityId; // Yes, object :)
public Guid ActivityId {
    get { return (Guid)_activityId; }
    set { _activityId = value; }
}

This works because the Guid is now boxed, and the assignment of reference types is atomic.

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1  
That won't compile; you need a cast. Also, you still don't need Interlocked. –  SLaks Dec 29 '11 at 16:24
1  
@SLaks You are right - I added the cast, removed Exchange, and added a quick explanation. Thanks for spotting the bug (I should have copy-pasted from my editor rather than re-typing with a missing cast). –  dasblinkenlight Dec 29 '11 at 16:31
    
This looks like it might return stale values from the getter. –  CodesInChaos Dec 29 '11 at 16:41
    
@CodeInChaos Since there is no locks here, there is definitely a possibility of having a race condition. You wouldn't get inconsistent results, through, because assignments of references are atomic. –  dasblinkenlight Dec 29 '11 at 16:51
    
No, what I mean is that the reading thread might cache a single value for (almost) ever. –  CodesInChaos Dec 29 '11 at 16:55
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You can get cheaper atomic assignment by creating your own box class:

class Box<T> where T : struct {
    public readonly T Value;
    public Box(T value) { Value = value; }
}

By storing a reference to the (immutable) Box instance instead of storing the value directly, all operations on the field will be atomic.

private Box<Guid> _activityId;
public Guid ActivityId {
    get { return this._activityId.Value; }
    set { this._activityId = new Box<Guid>(value); }
}

This way, the non-atomic struct copy operations happen in new Box<Guid>(value) and in the .Value access. Since they don't involve the field, they won't cause trouble.

This should be much faster than using byte arrays, and a little bit faster than native boxing with a cast. (disclaimer: I haven't measured)

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How come there is no need for Interlocked -or- the volatile modifier -or- some other "Theading" construct/class? –  Josh Dec 29 '11 at 16:32
1  
Because reference assignments are atomic. You may want Thread.MemoryBarrier(); I'm not sure. –  SLaks Dec 29 '11 at 16:33
    
@SLaks: MemoryBarrier() is mostly important for guaranteeing the order or making sure a loop doesn't optimize out loading a value from memory instead of just checking the register. You should be correct with your answer. –  Bengie Dec 29 '11 at 17:03
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