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I am making a game having squares in it (a grid of panels) and when the game ends there is an algorithm that changes the color of the panels one by one in a "live" fashion where the user watches the squares change color slowly. I try something like:

Thread.sleep(1000);      

grid.getComponent(boxNumber).setBackground(Color.YELLOW);

Thread.sleep(1000); 

grid.getComponent(boxNumber).setBackground(Color.ORANGE);

Although the color of a box changes to Yellow, it does not change to Orange afterwards. Anyone have any ideas? Hope I was able to be clear.

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Have you tried calling invalidate? –  javamonkey79 Dec 29 '11 at 16:25
    
Nope, dont know much about it. I am kinda new to Swing. Will give it a try. Thanks. EDIT:I just took a look and I am not sure how that is going to help me =/ –  Cemre Dec 29 '11 at 16:27
    
There in no need to call invalidate(). Swing components will repaint themselves automatically. –  camickr Dec 29 '11 at 16:39

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Read the section from the Swing tutorial on Concurrency to understand why you should not be using the sleep() method.

One solution is to use a SwingWorker, then you can 'publish' the color of the component so it can be updated properly on the EDT and you can invoke the sleep() method in the worker as well.

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These need to happen on the Swing event thread. call set background via:

SwingUtilities.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
  public void run() {
    grid.getComponent(boxNumber).setBackground(Color.ORANGE);
  }
});

Note, your Thread.sleep() should not be in the event thread (or directly from within a Swing event listener (ActionListener, WindowListener, etc).

It would also be prudent to look the Swing Timing Framework which is specifically for things like this.

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+1, the problem is likely the sleep on the EDT. –  camickr Dec 29 '11 at 16:36

-Generally its not a good idea to do Thread.sleep(1000); in the EDT. You should try using Timers.
-You also need to call revalidate()/validate() and repaint() afterward.

So maybe something like this:

Timer yellowTimer = new Timer(1000,new ActionListener() {
        @Override
        public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
             jtp.setBackground(Color.YELLOW);
            //call revalidate()/validate() and repaint() afterward
             jtp.revalidate();
             jtp.repaint();
        }
    });
yellowTimer.setRepeats(false);

Timer orangeTimer = new Timer(2000,new ActionListener() {
        @Override
        public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
             jtp.setBackground(Color.ORANGE);
             //call revalidate()/validate() and repaint() afterward
             jtp.revalidate();
             jtp.repaint();
        }
    });
orangeTimer.setRepeats(false);

yellowTimer.start();
orangeTimer.start();
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+1 Timer is a potential solution (but not the best since now the logic is spread across two classes). -1, revalidate() is not required since the size of the component doesn't change and repaint() is not required as Swing components are smart enough to repaint themselves. –  camickr Dec 29 '11 at 17:15

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