Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm trying to implement a FUSE-driven filesystem in Python, which serves data from both local and remote sources. The filesystem is handled by the main FUSE thread: filesystem requests are dealt with straight as they're requested.

class MyFilesystem(Fuse):
    def read(self, path, size, offset):
        if self._isLocalFile(path):
            return self._localRead(path, size, offset)
        elif self._isRemoteFile(path):
            # get file from server
    # ...

I had thought to create a second thread on initialization which keeps the communication open between client and server. Commands flow both ways, so the client currently uses a select() call to wait for any incoming commands.

class CommsClient(threading.Thread):
    def run(self):
        conn = self._connect()
        while True:
            r, w, e = select.select([conn], [], [], 1.0)
            if conn in r:
                self._handleData(conn)
    # ...

The problem I have now is connecting the two threads. When the filesystem thread deals with a request, it might have to block until the comms thread returns a reply from the server. I think one way of accomplishing this is plugging a request stream/socket from the filesystem thread into the select() call, but I'm not sure whether sockets are best used for inter-thread communication. Shortening the select() timeout and checking for an Event or inter-thread variable would also work, I guess, but I'd like the mechanism to be as fast as possible.

Does anyone know the best way to handle this situation?

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Using sockets for inter-thread communication is perfectly acceptable, but it will be slower than implementing it with threads and locks using in-memory data structures. Notice that 'slower' is relative: Hard disk operations might still be slower by a tenfold.

Although it's not a direct answer to the question, may I recommend you look at
ØMQ? It's a very fast, It gives you 'sockets' that carry whole messages across various transports like in-process, inter-process, TCP, and multicast and it has asynchronous I/O.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! Reading the ØMQ documentation (very interesting stuff indeed) I came up with method using locks. Works better for now since I'd already implemented the client/server communication, but I'll definitely use ØMQ next time. – ninjarabbit Dec 30 '11 at 1:27

Should anyone else benefit from it, the solution I used in the end involved using threading.Event locks and a non-blocking select() call:

class MyFilesystem(Fuse):
    def read(self, path, size, offset):
        if self._isLocalFile(path):
            return self._localRead(path, size, offset)
        elif self._isRemoteFile(path):
            # get file from server
            self.commsThread.requested_file = path
            self.commsThread.done_event.clear()
            self.commsThread.retrieved_file = None
            self.commsThread.request_event.set()

            self.commsThread.done_event.wait()

            return self.commsThread.retrieved_file[offset:offset+size]

class CommsClient(threading.Thread):
    def run(self):
        conn = self._connect()
        while True:
            self.request_event.wait(0.1)
            if self.request_event.is_set():

                conn.request_file(self.requested_file)

            r, w, e = select.select([conn], [], [], 0.0)

            if conn in r:
                self._handleData(conn)
                if self.retrieved_file:
                    self.done_event.set()
    # ...
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.