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I am using mingw g++ 4.6.1 with -O0, WinXP SP2.

Minimal working example is here.

g++ is configured with --disable-sjlj-exceptions --with-dwarf2.

GetLastError() returns 0 or 2 depeding on how the exception is thrown:

throw runtime_error(error_message());

bogus "error code: 0" is printed, and

const string msg = error_message();

throw runtime_error(msg);

prints "error code: 2" as expected.

First, I thought GetLastError() is invoked twice but debugging shows it is invoked exactly once, as expected.

What is going on?

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What happens if you modify your code to call error_message(GetLastError())? –  Greg Hewgill Dec 29 '11 at 18:10
    
You realize, of course, that "GetLastError()", C++ try/catch exceptions, and Win32 "Structured Exception Handling" (SEH) are all three different (related, but different) things, don't you? You typically use one or another, but you shouldn't generally use them together, in conjunction with each other. –  paulsm4 Dec 29 '11 at 18:12
    
@GregHewgill I want to hide GetLastError(), and I would like to use error_message() instead. –  Ali Dec 29 '11 at 18:12
    
@paulsm4 Please give more details. Also, please suggest a solution using C++ try/catch exceptions. –  Ali Dec 29 '11 at 18:14
    
Visual Studio produces the correct output in both cases, so the mingw compiler must be generating code in the first case that alters the last error code. Take a look at the generated assembly and I think you'll find some sort of system call –  Carey Gregory Dec 29 '11 at 18:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

It's possible that the code that sets up a throw calls a Win32 API function inside itself somewhere, that resets the Last-Error value to 0. This may be happening before your call to error_message().

Calling GetLastError() does not automatically reset the Last-Error value to 0, so it is safe to call twice.

Whether your compiler/runtime generates code that calls a Win32 API function will be up to your specific runtime. In order to be safe and not depend on this, use the two-statement version:

const string msg = error_message();
throw runtime_error(msg);

Better yet, for future readers of your code it would be useful to call GetLastError() outside error_message():

const string msg = error_message(GetLastError());
throw runtime_error(msg);

This way, readers will see the GetLastError() call immediately after the corresponding Win32 API call, where it belongs.

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If you look at the assembly code generated, it become clear what's happening. The following C++ code:

hDevice = CreateFileA(path, // drive to open
    // etc...
    );

if (hDevice == INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE) // cannot open the drive  
{                                                              
    throw runtime_error(error_message());
}

Generates a stretch of assembly code (at least using default optimization):

    call    _CreateFileA@28  #
LEHE4:
    sub esp, 28  #,
    mov DWORD PTR [ebp-12], eax  # hDevice, D.51673
    cmp DWORD PTR [ebp-12], -1   # hDevice,
    jne L5   #,
    mov DWORD PTR [esp], 8   #,

    call    ___cxa_allocate_exception    # // <--- this call is made between the 
                                             # //    CreateFile() call and the 
                                             # //    error_message() call

    mov ebx, eax     # D.50764,
    lea eax, [ebp-16]    # tmp66,
    mov DWORD PTR [esp], eax     #, tmp66
LEHB5:
    call    __Z13error_messagev  #

You see a call made to ___cxa_allocate_exception to allocate some memory block for the exception being thrown. That function call is changing the GetLastError() state.

When the C++ code looks like:

hDevice = CreateFileA(path, // drive to open
    // etc...
    );

if (hDevice == INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE) // cannot open the drive  
{                                                              
    const string msg = error_message();

    throw runtime_error(msg);
}

Then you get the following generated assembly:

    call    _CreateFileA@28  #
    sub esp, 28  #,
    mov DWORD PTR [ebp-12], eax  # hDevice, D.51674
    cmp DWORD PTR [ebp-12], -1   # hDevice,
    jne L5   #,
    lea eax, [ebp-16]    # tmp66,
    mov DWORD PTR [esp], eax     #, tmp66
    call    __Z13error_messagev  #
LEHE4:
    sub esp, 4   #,
    mov DWORD PTR [esp], 8   #,

    call    ___cxa_allocate_exception  # // <--- now this happens *after*
                                         //     error_message() has been called

which does not call an external function between the failed CreateFile() call and the call to error_message().

This kind of problem is one of the main problems with error handling using some global state like GetLastError() or errno.

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+1 Thanks for your efforts. Can suggest a clean solution to resolve this issue? Or is Greg Hewgill's answer the best we can do? –  Ali Dec 29 '11 at 19:36
    
Greg Hewgill's answer is the correct way to approach this (this answer was really just trying to make Greg's point concrete). Since you don't really have control over what a compiler does to implement throw (or any other statement for that matter), you can't have a throw statement thrown into the mix of getting the GetLastError() status. You have to GetLastError() strictly before the throw. –  Michael Burr Dec 29 '11 at 19:47
    
+1 Thanks for the analysis. –  Greg Hewgill Dec 30 '11 at 19:47

I suppose its windows exception implementation that is using some windows API function which is reseting last error to 0

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