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#include<stdio.h>
 int main()
 {
   float a;
   printf("Enter a number:");
   scanf("%f",&a);
   printf("%d",a);
   return 0;
 }

I am running the program with gcc in Ubuntu. For values--

          3.3 it gives value 1610612736 
          3.4 it gives value 1073741824
          3.5 it gives value 0
          3.6 it gives value -1073741824
          4 it gives value 0
          5 it gives value 0

What is happening? Why are these values printed? I'm doing this intentionally, but would like to understand why this is happening. Details are appreciated!

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7 Answers 7

up vote 21 down vote accepted

The printf function does not know the type of format you passed in, because that part is variadic.

int printf(const char* format, ...);
//                             ^^^

In the C standard, passing a float will be automatically promoted to a double (C11§6.5.2.2/6), and nothing else will be done in the caller side.

Inside printf, since it doesn't know the type of that ... thingie (§6.7.6.3/9), it has to use the hint from elsewhere — the format string. Since you've passed "%d", it is telling the function that, an int is expected.

According to the C standard, this leads to undefined behavior (§7.21.6.1/8–9), which includes the possibility of printing some weird number, end of story.

But what is really happening? In most platforms, a double is represented as "IEEE 754 binary64" format, and a float in binary32 format. The numbers you've entered are converted to a float, which only has 23 bits of significance, which means the numbers will be approximated like this:

3.3 ~ (0b1.10100110011001100110011) × 2¹  (actually: 3.2999999523162842...)
3.4 ~ (0b1.10110011001100110011010) × 2¹  (actually: 3.4000000953674316...)
3.5 = (0b1.11                     ) × 2¹  (actually: 3.5)
3.6 ~ (0b1.11001100110011001100110) × 2¹  (actually: 3.5999999046325684...)
4   = (0b1                        ) × 2²  (actually: 4)
5   = (0b1.01                     ) × 2²  (actually: 5)

Now we convert this to double, which has 53 bits of significance, which we have to insert 30 binary "0"'s at the end of these numbers, to produce e.g.

3.299999952316284 = 0b1.10100110011001100110011000000000000000000000000000000 ×2¹

These are mainly to derive the actual representation of those numbers, which are:

3.3 → 400A6666 60000000
3.4 → 400B3333 40000000
3.5 → 400C0000 00000000
3.6 → 400CCCCC C0000000
4   → 40100000 00000000
5   → 40140000 00000000

I recommend using http://www.binaryconvert.com/convert_double.html to see how this breaks down to the ±m × 2e format.

Anyway, I suppose your system is an x86/x86_64/ARM in normal setting, which means the numbers are laid out in memory using little-endian format, so the arguments passed will be like

 byte
  #0   #1   ...          #4   ...            #8 ....
+----+----+----+----+  +----+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+
| 08 | 10 | 02 | 00 |  | 00 | 00 | 00 | 60 | 66 | 66 | 0A | 40 | ....
+----+----+----+----+  +----+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+
 address of "%d"         content of 3.299999952316284
 (just an example)

Inside the printf, it consumes the format string "%d", parses it, and then finds out that an int is needed because of %d, so 4 bytes are taken from the variadic input, which is:

 byte
  #0   #1   ...          #4   ...            #8 ....
+ - -+ - -+ - -+ - -+  +====+====+====+====+ - -+ - -+ - -+ - -+
: 08 : 10 : 02 : 00 :  | 00 | 00 | 00 | 60 | 66 : 66 : 0A : 40 : ....
+ - -+ - -+ - -+ - -+  +====+====+====+====+ - -+ - -+ - -+ - -+
 address of "%d"        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                        this, as an 'int'

so, printf will receive 0x60000000, and display it as a decimal integer, which is 1610612736, which is why you see that result. The other numbers can be explained similarly.

3.3 → ... 60000000 = 1610612736
3.4 → ... 40000000 = 1073741824
3.5 → ... 00000000 = 0
3.6 → ... C0000000 = -1073741824 (note 2's complement)
4   → ... 00000000 = 0
5   → ... 00000000 = 0
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+1 for taking the time to write all this up. :) –  Mysticial Dec 29 '11 at 19:29
    
For completeness, a couple of useful Two's complement links, Two's Complement - Wikipedia and Two's Complement notes Thomas Finley. –  mctylr Dec 29 '11 at 20:04

I'm assuming that the other answers so-far posted are missing the point: I think you're deliberately using different conversions for scanning and printing, and want to understand the results. If, indeed, you just made a mistake, then you can ignore my answer.

Basically, you need to read this article, which will explain how the bit patterns for floating-point numbers are defined, then write out the bit patterns for each of those numbers. Given that you understand how integers are stored, you should then have your answers.

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The d conversion specifier you use in your second printf statement requires an argument of type int. Your argument a after C default argument promotion is of type double. Passing an argument of a different type that the one expected is an undefined behavior and as usual with undefined behavior, anything can happen.

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If you want to know exactly what's going on, try printf('0x%08x\n', a); instead of printf("%d",a);. You'll be able to see the actual bits of the variable a instead of what printf("%d",a); is giving you.

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simply because printf ("%d",a); : think that the memory in a is a int so it interpret its content as an int. and printf("%f",a); consider the content ofthe memory of a as a float which it is really...

but if you write printf("%d",(int)a); // a is transformed to an int (by (int) cast with truncation). so the approximativ value of a is printed.

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In C, floats passed as arguments to functions with variable number of arguments get promoted to doubles. That's why in the reference of the format string of the printf function you will not see different format specifiers for floats and for doubles. So, your "a" gets converted from a 32-bit float to a 64-bit double when passed to printf. It just so happens that 4 and 5 are represented as doubles in such a way that 32 out of the 64 bits are zeros, and these zero bits are the ones that the printf function interprets as an integer, since you told it to print an integer.

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printf() interprets its variable length argument(s) using the format specifiers that has been mentioned in the first parameter. The signature of printf() is as follows.

int printf(const char *format, ...);

So the printf() code would probably be written like this using stdarg.h.

int printf(const char *format, ...) {
    va_list ap;
    char *p, *sval;
    int ival;
    float fval;

    va_start(ap, format);
    for(p=format; *p ; p++) {
        if (*p != '%') {
            putchar(*p);
            continue;
        }
        switch(*++p) {
            case 'd':
                ival = va_arg(ap, int);
                break;

            case 'f':
                fval = va_arg(ap, float);
                break;

            case 's':
                for (sval = va_arg(ap, char *); *sval; sval++);
                break;

            default:
                putchar(*p);
                break;
        }
    }
    va_end(ap);
}

So if you pass %d for a float then you can figure out what will happen inside the printf(). The printf() will interpret a float variable as an int and this behavior is undefined!

Hope this helps!

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