Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

Resultset has no method for hasNext. I want to check if the resultSet has any value

is this the correct way

if (!resultSet.next() ) {
    System.out.println("no data");
}
share|improve this question
2  
The second answer is the right one. –  JohnMerlino Jul 20 '14 at 22:34

15 Answers 15

up vote 97 down vote accepted

That's correct, initially the ResultSet's cursor is pointing to before the first row, if the first call to next() returns false then there was no data in the ResultSet.

If you use this method, you may have to call beforeFirst() immediately after to reset it, since it has positioned itself past the first row now.

It should be noted however, that Seifer's answer below is a more elegant solution to this question.

share|improve this answer
21  
But keep in mind, if there /are/ rows, after that test you will be pointing to the first row. So make sure you don't accidentally skip a row. –  Matthew Flaschen May 15 '09 at 6:15
    
Good point that the cursor (pointer) is pointing at the first row –  JohnMerlino Jun 11 '14 at 16:21
    
@MatthewFlaschen, you're right, to solve the issue of skip the first row, i used a do { ... } while (rs.next); –  Israelm Jul 22 '14 at 19:19
2  
You can also just call isBeforeFirst() to test if there are any rows returned without advancing the cursor, then proceed normally. –  SnakeDoc Sep 2 '14 at 19:00

According to the most viable answer the suggestion is to use "isBeforeFirst()". That's not the best solution if you don't have a "forward only type".

There's a method called ".first()". It's less overkill to get the exact same result. You check whether there is something in your "resultset" and don't advance your cursor.

The documentation states: "(...) false if there are no rows in the result set".

if(rs.first()){
    //do stuff      
}

You can also just call isBeforeFirst() to test if there are any rows returned without advancing the cursor, then proceed normally. – SnakeDoc Sep 2 '14 at 19:00

However, there's a difference between "isBeforeFirst()" and "first()". First generates an exception if done on a resultset from type "forward only".

Compare the two throw sections: http://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/sql/ResultSet.html#isBeforeFirst() http://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/sql/ResultSet.html#first()

Okay, basically this means that you should use "isBeforeFirst" as long as you have a "forward only" type. Otherwise it's less overkill to use "first()".

share|improve this answer
ResultSet result = stmt.executeQuery(sqlQuery);
if (!result.next())
    status = "ERROR";
else
    status = "SUCCESS";
share|improve this answer
ResultSet rs = rs.executeQuery();
if(rs.next())
{
  rs = rs.executeQuery();
  while(rs.next())
  {
    //do code part
  }
}
else
{
  //else if no result set
}

It is better to re execute query because when we call if(rs.next()){....} first row of ResultSet will be executed and after it inside while(rs.next()){....} we'll get result from next line. So I think re-execution of query inside if is the better option.

share|improve this answer

By using resultSet.next() you can easily get the result, whether resultSet containing any value or not

ResultSet resultSet = preparedStatement.executeQuery();
if(resultSet.next())
 //resultSet contain some values
else
 // empty resultSet
share|improve this answer
    
Don't repeat existing answers. –  james.garriss Mar 13 at 14:42

Initially, the result set object (rs) points to the BFR (before first record). Once we use rs.next(), the cursor points to the first record and the rs holds "true". Using the while loop you can print all the records of the table. After all the records are retrieved, the cursor moves to ALR (After last record) and it will be set to null. Let us consider that there are 2 records in the table.

if(rs.next()==false){
    // there are no records found
    }    

while (rs.next()==true){
    // print all the records of the table
    }

In short hand, we can also write the condition as while (rs.next()).

share|improve this answer
1  
Your while loop will not get a chance to operate on the first row returned, which seems a somewhat fatal flaw with this approach. There are plenty of suggestions above that are better than this one. –  Jules May 20 '14 at 17:04

To be totally sure of rather the resultset is empty or not regardless of cursor position, I would do something like this:

public static boolean isMyResultSetEmpty(ResultSet rs) throws SQLException {
    return (!rs.isBeforeFirst() && rs.getRow() == 0);
}

This function will return true if ResultSet is empty, false if not or throw an SQLException if that ResultSet is closed/uninitialized.

share|improve this answer

you can do something like this

boolean found = false;

while ( resultSet.next() )
{
    found = true;
    resultSet.getString("column_name");
}

if (!found)
    System.out.println("No Data");
share|improve this answer
    
WAAAY too complicated. –  jordaniac89 May 7 at 20:47

The best thing for to do is to check the first row so that when you intend to get the data you can avoid the mistake of skipping a row. Something like: if (!resultSet.first() ) { System.out.println("no data"); }

share|improve this answer

Best to use ResultSet.next() along with the do {...} while() syntax for this.

The "check for any results" call ResultSet.next() moves the cursor to the first row, so use the do {...} while() syntax to process that row while continuing to process remaining rows returned by the loop.

This way you get to check for any results, while at the same time also processing any results returned.

if(resultSet.next()) { // Checks for any results and moves cursor to first row,
    do { // Use 'do...while' to process the first row, while continuing to process remaining rows

    } while (resultSet.next());
}
share|improve this answer
if(reset.first) {

} else { 
    system.out.println("No raw or reset is empty");
}

Because if ResultSet has no raw then reset.first returns false.

share|improve this answer

Assuming you are working with a newly returned ResultSet whose cursor is pointing before the first row, an easier way to check this is to just call isBeforeFirst(). This avoids having to back-track if the data is to be read.

As explained in the documentation, this returns false if the cursor is not before the first record or if there are no rows in the ResultSet.

if (!resultSet.isBeforeFirst() ) {    
 System.out.println("No data"); 
} 
share|improve this answer
11  
Thanks, yes I know but I encountered the same problem and wasn't happy with the look of moving forward to check then backward to read. I thought this simplier solution would benefit others who are in the same situation as well. –  Seifer Jul 26 '11 at 4:03
5  
Note that, at least for DB2, the result set has to be a "scrollable" type. This can be set when you create the statement to be executed. –  jjokin Sep 4 '13 at 7:53

you could always do the next up front, and just do a post loop check

if (!resultSet.next() ) {
    System.out.println("no data");
} else {

    do {
     //statement(s)
    } while (resultSet.next());
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is the most readable solution, thanks –  Ademir Nuno Jul 17 '14 at 14:44
    
I don't personally find this most readable, but, to each his own... –  rogerdpack Oct 6 '14 at 12:24

That would work if you want to see if there are any rows in the result set yes.

Note that next() always moves to the next row, so if you are planning on doing any reading from the result set you need to take that into account.

Usual usage with ResultSet (when simply reading) is:

while (resultSet.next())
{
   ... read from the row here ...
}

Which obviously won't work correctly if you invoked next() once already to check if the result set was empty, so watch out for that. Although there are methods for "backing up", they are not supported for all types of result sets.

share|improve this answer

You would usually do something like this:

while ( resultSet.next() ) { 
   // Read the next item
   resultSet.getString("columnName");
}

If you want to report an empty set, add a variable counting the items read. If you only need to read a single item, then your code is adequate.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.