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This question may sound familiar but not quite the same as asked before.

I have a CSS that is sent to browsers with no javascript functionality (referenced by a link tag). I have another CSS which is used by the ajax version of the site and is injected to the page by JS. Each of these files are relatively big (gt 200K). I don't want the JS enabled clients to download both files. I can do this easily using noscript tag. But that has the limitation in cases where the user is behind a proxy that filters script tags. So the browser ends up with no CSS altogether.

<html>
<head>
<noscript><link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="nojs.css" /></noscript>
<script>
document.write('<link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="js.css" />');
</script>
</head>
<body></body>
</html>

My attempt to use HTML comments in a non-standard way worked in Chrome but failed in FF:

<html>
<head>
<script>
document.write('<link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="js.css" />');
document.write('<!----');
</script>
<link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="nojs.css" /><!-- -->
</head>
<body></body>
</html>

Both browsers parse the HTML correctly (not sure if IE and Opera would too), but FF downloads the nojs.css in all cases (without actually applying it when JS is enabled).

Any ideas?

share|improve this question
    
And... why no <noscript> ? –  Tom van der Woerdt Dec 29 '11 at 19:02
    
How about redirect to another page, if JS enabled –  Dmitry Zaitsev Dec 29 '11 at 19:09
    
@TomvanderWoerdt, I've mentioned that in the question. Because certain proxies filter script content while the browser on the other end can have JS enabled. So the browser will ignore the stuff in noscript tags and having no JS content to run, the user will be left with no CSS. –  Mansour Dec 29 '11 at 19:10
    
@biovamp, not practical. The URLs on the site are the same for all users regardless of their browser capabilities. This is important when other sites link to the pages on this site as well as for web crawlers. Also, I want to avoid downloading extra unnecessary content which takes time. A page re-load will cause visual artefact and delay as well as extra downloaded content. –  Mansour Dec 29 '11 at 19:15
2  
Why don't you just clean up your CSS? –  Tom van der Woerdt Dec 29 '11 at 19:27

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The prefetching mechanism of Firefox seems to ignore the comment and preloads the CSS file, but only if it's referenced as a link element.

Use a CSS import statement instead to suppress prefetching of the unused file:

<html>
  <head>
    <script>
      document.write('<link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="js.css" />');
      document.write('<!--');
    </script>
    <style>
      @import url(nojs.css)
    </style>
    <!-- -->
  </head>
<body>
...
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Julian - tried it and it works. I've heard about issues with @ import and constant advice against using it. Does using @ import in this setting have any disadvantage compared to using link tags? –  Mansour Dec 29 '11 at 22:06
2  
The only problem using @import I can think of is exactly the different prefetching behaviour - here it is explicitly wanted, but in other situations it may become some disadvantage. In the older days there also was the infamous Flash of Unstyled Content, but I haven't heard from that one for a long time... –  Julian D. Dec 29 '11 at 22:28

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