Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following type :

// incomplete class definition
public class Person
{
    private string name;

    public string Name
    {
        get { return this.name; }
    }
}

I want this type to be created and updated with some sort of dedicated controller/builder, but I want it to remain read-only for other types.

This object also needs to fire an event every time it is updated by its controller/builder.

To summary, according to the previous type definition skeleton :

  • The Person could only be instantiated by a specific controller
  • This controller could update the state of the Person (name field) at any time
  • The Person need to send a notification to the rest of the world when it occurs
  • All other types should only be able to read Person attributes

How should I implement this ? I'm talking about a controller/builder here, but all others solutions are welcome.

Note : I would be able to rely on the internal modifier, but ideally all my stuff should be in the same assembly.

share|improve this question
add comment

6 Answers

Create an interface IReadOnlyPerson which exposes only get accessors. Have Person implement IReadOnlyPerson. Store the reference to Person in your controller. Give other clients only the read only version.

This will protect against mistakes, but not fraud, as with most OO features. Clients can runtime cast to Person if they happen to know (or suspect) IReadOnlyPerson is implemented by Person.

Update, per the comment:

The Read Only interface may also expose an event delegate, just like any other object. The idiom generally used in C# doesn't prevent clients from messing with the list of listeners, but convention is only to add listeners, so that should be adequate. Inside any set accessor or function with state-changing side effects, just call the event delegate with a guard for the null (no listeners) case.

share|improve this answer
    
This answer could be the good one, but it doesn't cover the second part of the question : The Person need to send a notification to the rest of the world when it occurs –  Seb Sep 18 '08 at 7:51
2  
Check out the "System.ComponentModel.INotifyPropertyChanged" interface for the standard method of notifying interested parties that a property of the object has changed. –  Adrian Clark Sep 18 '08 at 17:07
add comment

I like to have a read-only interface. Then the builder/controller/whatever can reference the object directly, but when you expose this object to the outside you show only the interface.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Use an interface IPerson and a nested class:

public class Creator
{
    private class Person : IPerson
    {
        public string Name { get; set; }
    }

    public IPerson Create(...) ...


    public void Modify(IPerson person, ...)
    {
        Person dude = person as Person;
        if (dude == null)
            // wasn't created by this class.
        else
            // update the data.
    }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

I think internal is the least complex and best approach (this of course involves multiple assemblies). Short of doing some overhead intensive stack walking to determine the caller in the property setter you could try:

interface IPerson 
{
    Name { get; set; } 
}

and implement this interface explicitly:

class Person : IPerson 
{
    Name { get; private set; }
    string IPerson.Name { get { return Name; } set { Name = value; } } 
}

then perform explicit interface casts in your builder for setting properties. This still doesn't protect your implementation and isn't a good solution though it does go some way to emphasize your intention.

In your property setters you'll have to implement an event notification. Approaching this problem myself I would not create separate events and event handlers for each property but instead create a single PropertyChanged event and fire it in each property when a change occurs (where the event arguments would include the property name, old value, and new value).

share|improve this answer
add comment

Seems odd that, though I cannot change the name of the Person object, I can simply grab its controller and change it there. That's not a good way to secure your object's data.

But, notwithstanding, here's a way to do it:

    /// <summary>
    /// A controlled person.  Not production worthy code.
    /// </summary>
    public class Person
    {
    	private string _name;
    	public string Name
    	{
    		get { return _name; }
    		private set
    		{
    			_name = value;
    			OnNameChanged();
    		}
    	}
    	/// <summary>
    	/// This person's controller
    	/// </summary>
    	public PersonController Controller
    	{
    		get { return _controller ?? (_controller = new PersonController(this)); }
    	}
    	private PersonController _controller;

    	/// <summary>
    	/// Fires when <seealso cref="Name"/> changes.  Go get the new name yourself.
    	/// </summary>
    	public event EventHandler NameChanged;

    	private void OnNameChanged()
    	{
    		if (NameChanged != null)
    			NameChanged(this, EventArgs.Empty);
    	}

    	/// <summary>
    	/// A Person controller.
    	/// </summary>
    	public class PersonController
    	{
    		Person _slave;
    		public PersonController(Person slave)
    		{
    			_slave = slave;
    		}
    		/// <summary>
    		/// Sets the name on the controlled person.
    		/// </summary>
    		/// <param name="name">The name to set.</param>
    		public void SetName(string name) { _slave.Name = name; }
    	}
    }
share|improve this answer
add comment

Maybe something like that ?

public class Person
{
    public class Editor
    {
        private readonly Person person;

        public Editor(Person p)
        {
            person = p;
        }

        public void SetName(string name)
        {
            person.name = name;
        }

        public static Person Create(string name)
        {
            return new Person(name);
        }
    }

    protected string name;

    public string Name
    {
        get { return this.name; }
    }

    protected Person(string name)
    {
        this.name = name;
    }
}

Person p = Person.Editor.Create("John");
Person.Editor e = new Person.Editor(p);
e.SetName("Jane");

Not pretty, but I think it works. Alternatively you can use properties instead of SetX methods on the editor.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.