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We ran into some strange results recently in one of our Perl scripts, where the NULL character (\0 in Perl) was being introduced into some text. We ultimately tracked it down to the //g operator being used on the Perl m// match operator by accident. Until this happened, I wasn't even aware you could use //g with the m// operator, as I had only ever used it with the s/// operator.

In any event, even though we have fixed the bug by removing the errant //g, I would love to know WHY this small script introduces a NULL character into the text! :-)

my $text = "01";

if ($text =~ m/(\d+)/g)
{
    $text = "A$1";
}

if ($text =~ m/\0/)
{
    print "Text contains NULL!\n";
}

Subtle changes that prevent NULL from appearing: If I change the value of $text (e.g. to just "0" or just "1" or many other combinations), the NULL is no longer introduced. If I change the assignment value from "A$1" to just "$1", the NULL is no longer introduced. If I assign "A$1" to a totally different variable, then NULL is not introduced into that variable. And if I remove the //g operator during the m// match, the NULL is not introduced.

Can a Perl guru explain this behavior please? I could not find anything by googling.

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3  
I see the problem in Perl 5.10.1 and 5.12.2. I don't see it in 5.13.6 or 5.14.0. Looks like it's been fixed. –  Keith Thompson Dec 29 '11 at 22:03

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted
if ($text =~ m/(\d+)/g)

is wrong. Specifically, code of the form if (/.../g) is wrong. It makes no sense conceptually ("If match until it doesn't match"???) and can give undesired results.

$_ = "01ab";
if (/(\d+)/g) { say $1; }   # 01
if (/(.*)/g)  { say $1; }   # ab!!!

Get rid of the "g".


The end of a string is normally followed by a NUL.

$ perl -MDevel::Peek -e'Dump "01"'
SV = PV(0x88b4740) at 0x88d1368
  REFCNT = 1
  FLAGS = (PADTMP,POK,READONLY,pPOK)
  PV = 0x88d52f0 "01"\0
  CUR = 2
  LEN = 12

Your version of Perl appears to have a bug where it's matching that NUL when the starting position of the match is at the end of the string. No NULs are being inserted. Fortunately, if you fix your buggy code, you won't suffer from this bug.


../perl/Porting/bisect.pl           \
   --target=miniperl --expect-fail  \
   --start=v5.13.0 --end=v5.14.0    \
   -e'
      my $text = "01";
      if ($text =~ m/(\d+)/g) { $text = "A$1"; }
      exit($text =~ m/\0/ ? 1 : 0);
   '

shows that it was fixed by 6f1401dc2acd2a2b85df22b0a74e5f7e6e0a33aa.

Based git tag --contains 6f1401dc2acd2a2b85df22b0a74e5f7e6e0a33aa, 5.13.2 is the first dev release and 5.14.0 is the first production release to have the fix.

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4  
I use if (/.../g) all the time; in scalar context, /g isn't "until" –  ysth Dec 29 '11 at 22:17
1  
@ysth, while (//g) makes sense. if (//gc) is an advanced use that makes sense. if (//g) not so much. I presume you're unrolling while loops if you use if (//g), in which case you know you meant to do that. But you know that, so what's your point? –  ikegami Dec 29 '11 at 22:50
    
Yes, I did mean with /c, though without /c could make sense at the end of a chain of /gc ifs. But my point is "match until it doesn't match" is not an accurate description. –  ysth Dec 29 '11 at 23:19
    
@ysth, That's my point. Whatever they're thinking it means can't possibly be accurate. –  ikegami Dec 29 '11 at 23:30
    
Thanks for the feedback on this, the use of Devel::Peek is something I hadn't thought of to test. I agree, the use of //g doesn't make sense in an if() statement, but after reading that //g could be used with m//, I was just curious as to how the NUL could be inserted in the code shown. But as @Dan pointed out and Keith Thompson confirmed, it seems that ultimately the NUL "insertion" behavior is a bug that has been fixed in more recent versions of Perl. –  Mason G. Zhwiti Dec 30 '11 at 0:43

There's a perl bug, but you also have a programming problem. Don't rely on the value of special variables except in the immediate statement after they are set. Store their values right away.

When you run into these sorts of problems, look at the data. This turns out to be a weird one that looks like a bug with handling capture buffers.

use v5.10;
use feature qw(unicode_strings);

my $text = "01";

if ($text =~ m/(\d+)/g)
{
    say "\$1 [$1]: ", join ' ', map { sprintf '%04X', ord } split //, $1;
    say 'Text: ', join ' ', map { sprintf '%04X', ord } split //, $text;

    $text = "A$1";
    say "\$1 [$1]: ", join ' ', map { sprintf '%04X', ord } split //, $1;
    say 'Text: ', join ' ', map { sprintf '%04X', ord } split //, $text;
}

Everything looks right until you actually want to use $1 to build the new string to assign to the same variable, at which point the value seemingly disappears. Notice that after the assignment, $1 is different:

% perl5.12.2 test.pl
$1 [01]: 0030 0031
Text: 0030 0031
$1 [AA]: 0041 0041
Text: 0041 0041 0000

It's different in a weird way too. perl does some tricky handling to remember offsets in a string. With v5.14, $1 is still the first two characters in the string:

% perl5.14.2 test.pl
$1 [01]: 0030 0031
Text: 0030 0031
$1 [A0]: 0041 0030
Text: 0041 0030 0031

This problem doesn't crop up if you assign to a new variable instead of using $test and $1 in the same statement (which should be perfectly fine, but we all know what "should be" often means). It also isn't a problem if you immediately capture the value of the special variable:

use v5.10;
use feature qw(unicode_strings);

my $text = "01";

if ($text =~ m/(\d+)/g)
{
    my $one = $1;
    say "\$1 [$1]: ", join ' ', map { sprintf '%04X', ord } split //, $1;
    say 'Text: ', join ' ', map { sprintf '%04X', ord } split //, $text;

    $text = "A$one";
    say "\$1 [$1]: ", join ' ', map { sprintf '%04X', ord } split //, $1;
    say 'Text: ', join ' ', map { sprintf '%04X', ord } split //, $text;
}

Now, even v5.12 gets it right:

$ perl5.12.2 test.pl
$1 [01]: 0030 0031
Text: 0030 0031
$1 [A0]: 0041 0030
Text: 0041 0030 0031
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$ perl -e '$text = "01"; if ($text =~ m/(\d+)/g) { $text = "A$1"; }; print "$text\n"; print "Contains nul" if $text =~ m/\0/''
A01

(perl 5.12.4)

As @Dan says, this is a bug.

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This is clearly a bug. Check it on the latest version, if it's still a problem, here's how to file a bug report:

http://perldoc.perl.org/perlbug.html

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1  
I see the problem in Perl 5.10.1 and 5.12.2. I don't see it in 5.13.6 or 5.14.0. Looks like it's been fixed. –  Keith Thompson Dec 29 '11 at 22:00

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