Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I know feature hashing (hashing-trick) is used to reduce the dimensionality and handle sparsity of bit vectors but I don't understand how it really works. Can anyone explain this to me.Is there any python library available to do feature hashing?

Thank you.

share|improve this question
    
Are you looking for something like this? shogun-toolbox.org –  S.Lott Dec 29 '11 at 20:32

4 Answers 4

Here (sorry I cannot add this as a comment for some reason.) Also, the first page of Feature Hashing for Large Scale Multitask Learning explains it nicely.

share|improve this answer

scikit-learn has a hashing trick implementation. (Full disclosure: I implemented it.)

Gensim has one too, but I didn't try it out yet.

share|improve this answer

Are you looking for something like folded fingerprints?

I mean a map from your space of features (2^N large, where N is the number of features >> 1024) to 2^1024, and such that an item with the 'typical' number of features is coded into a 1024 bits long vector with about 1024/2 bits on.

In this case you could write yourself a "features hashing" that reduce the dimensionality and handle sparsity of bit vectors.

share|improve this answer

On Pandas, you could use something like this:

import pandas as pd
import numpy as np

data = {'state': ['Ohio', 'Ohio', 'Ohio', 'Nevada', 'Nevada'],
        'year': [2000, 2001, 2002, 2001, 2002],
        'pop': [1.5, 1.7, 3.6, 2.4, 2.9]}

data = pd.DataFrame(data)

def hash_col(df, col, N):
    cols = [col + "_" + str(i) for i in range(N)]
    def xform(x): tmp = [0 for i in range(N)]; tmp[hash(x) % N] = 1; return pd.Series(tmp,index=cols)
    df[cols] = df[col].apply(xform)
    return df.drop(col,axis=1)

print hash_col(data, 'state',4)

The output would be

   pop  year  state_0  state_1  state_2  state_3
0  1.5  2000        0        1        0        0
1  1.7  2001        0        1        0        0
2  3.6  2002        0        1        0        0
3  2.4  2001        0        0        0        1
4  2.9  2002        0        0        0        1

Also on Series level, you could

import numpy as np, os import sys, pandas as pd

def hash_col(df, col, N):
    df = df.replace('',np.nan)
    cols = [col + "_" + str(i) for i in range(N)]
    tmp = [0 for i in range(N)]
    tmp[hash(df.ix[col]) % N] = 1
    res = df.append(pd.Series(tmp,index=cols))
    return res.drop(col)

a = pd.Series(['new york',30,''],index=['city','age','test'])
b = pd.Series(['boston',30,''],index=['city','age','test'])

print hash_col(a,'city',10)
print hash_col(b,'city',10)

This will work per single Series, column name will be assumed to be a Pandas index. It also replaces blank strings with nan, and floats everything.

age        30
test      NaN
city_0      0
city_1      0
city_2      0
city_3      0
city_4      0
city_5      0
city_6      0
city_7      1
city_8      0
city_9      0
dtype: object
age        30
test      NaN
city_0      0
city_1      0
city_2      0
city_3      0
city_4      0
city_5      1
city_6      0
city_7      0
city_8      0
city_9      0
dtype: object

If, however, there is a vocabulary, and you simply want to one-hot-encode, you could use

import numpy as np
import pandas as pd, os
import scipy.sparse as sps

def hash_col(df, col, vocab):
    cols = [col + "=" + str(v) for v in vocab]
    def xform(x): tmp = [0 for i in range(len(vocab))]; tmp[vocab.index(x)] = 1; return pd.Series(tmp,index=cols)
    df[cols] = df[col].apply(xform)
    return df.drop(col,axis=1)

data = {'state': ['Ohio', 'Ohio', 'Ohio', 'Nevada', 'Nevada'],
        'year': [2000, 2001, 2002, 2001, 2002],
        'pop': [1.5, 1.7, 3.6, 2.4, 2.9]}

df = pd.DataFrame(data)

df2 = hash_col(df, 'state', ['Ohio','Nevada'])

print sps.csr_matrix(df2)

which will give

   pop  year  state=Ohio  state=Nevada
0  1.5  2000           1             0
1  1.7  2001           1             0
2  3.6  2002           1             0
3  2.4  2001           0             1
4  2.9  2002           0             1

I also added sparsification of the final dataframe as well. In incremental setting where we might not have encountered all values beforehand (but we somehow obtained the list of all possible values somehow), the approach above can be used. Incremental ML methods would need the same number of features at each increment, hence one-hot encoding must produce the same number of rows at each batch.

share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately, this is not reliable as Python's hash may use a random seed (when called as python -R, by default in newer Python 3.x). Results may differ between runs of the script. See my answer for a more robust implementation. –  larsmans Jun 12 '13 at 10:23
    
Please feel free to use any other hash() function in place of the simple one shown above. Besides that the snippet does everything I need - is Pandas based does column renaming, one-hot-encoding based on N, etc. –  user423805 Jun 12 '13 at 10:44

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.