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I'm trying to make a jQuery .ajax() call to a public web service, and I'm having trouble finding the right syntax.

I've tried several different implementations. This one:

$.ajax({
  url: 'http://www.geognos.com/api/en/countries/info/all.jsonp',
  dataType: "jsonp",
  success: function() {
    alert('JSONP call succeeded!');
  }
});

It fails with the following error:

all.jsonp:1 Uncaught ReferenceError: callback is not defined

And this one:

$.ajax({
  url: 'http://www.geognos.com/api/en/countries/info/all.json',
  dataType: "json",
  success: function() {
    alert('JSON call succeeded!');
  }
});

Fails with this error:

XMLHttpRequest cannot load http://www.geognos.com/api/en/countries/info/all.json. Origin http://localhost:8888 is not allowed by Access-Control-Allow-Origin.

I'm serving the page through my local IIS7 instance. I've also tried various combinations of $.getJSON() with similar results. What am I missing?

Here's a JSFiddle of the above code.

UPDATE: Thought we had a solution, but I'm still getting the callback is not defined error when doing the JSONP calls, even though the alert/log code gets called. The response URL looks like this:

http://www.geognos.com/api/en/countries/info/all.jsonp?callback=undefined&157148585

and the JSON response is wrapped like this:

callback({"StatusMsg": "OK", "Results": {"BD": {"Name": "Bangladesh", "Capital": {"DLST": "null", "TD": 6.0, "Flg": 2, "Name": "Dhaka", ...

I've found examples with the callback name added on to the end of the URL in the .ajax() configuration, but when I try that I get the same result, only it's tacked on to the end of my query string.

share|improve this question
    
Don't use alert() to debug. Use console.log(). –  Josh Smith Dec 29 '11 at 20:32

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

This regular JSON call will not work because of same origin policy. This is what your error is telling you with: is not allowed by Access-Control-Allow-Origin.

The correct JSONP syntax is:

$.ajax({
    url: 'http://www.geognos.com/api/en/countries/info/all.jsonp',
    dataType: "jsonp",
    jsonpCallback: 'callback',
    success: function(data) {
        console.log(data);
    }
});

DEMO

share|improve this answer
    
I'm aware of the same origin policy. However, JSONP is not. But I'm having trouble figuring out the correct callback syntax with jQuery. –  Josh Earl Dec 29 '11 at 20:36
    
@JoshEarl I was still adding the syntactical fixes for the JSONP piece. This will work fine. –  Josh Smith Dec 29 '11 at 20:43
    
Yep, works great. Still not sure I understand the jsonpCallback syntax. Is it telling the browser what to expect the wrapper function will be called? All of the examples I've found so far describe appending whatever name you want to the end of your URL. Maybe this API just doesn't support naming your own callback. –  Josh Earl Dec 29 '11 at 21:17
    
You can call it whatever you want and it should work just the same on your end. Here's a demo. They expect you to name it callback, though, so you should probably stick with that convention. –  Josh Smith Dec 29 '11 at 21:24
    
If I use exactly what you have above, it works and outputs an Object to the console. If I make any changes at all, something breaks: using a different name in jsonpCallback, using a function name for success instead of an inline function. Bleh--hate copy/paste programming. The documentation on this is really poor. Appreciate the help, though. –  Josh Earl Dec 29 '11 at 21:40

The correct usage is buried in the documentation for $.ajax(). Search for the jsonpCallback option.

$.ajax({
  url: 'http://www.geognos.com/api/en/countries/info/all.jsonp',
  dataType: "jsonp",
  jsonpCallback: function() {
    alert('JSONP call succeeded!');
  }
});

Fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/gya3b/3/

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, Matt. The jsonpCallback piece was what I was missing. –  Josh Earl Dec 29 '11 at 20:46
    
You'll see in my answer that you can specify the string 'callback' which will effectively use your success: function(). –  Josh Smith Dec 29 '11 at 20:47
    
Or you do it my way and use one less property. :) –  Matt Bradley Dec 29 '11 at 20:48
    
I haven't used jsonpCallback, but documentation sez: "jsonpCallback... This value will be used instead of the random name automatically generated by jQuery... As of jQuery 1.5, you can also use a function for this setting, in which case the value of jsonpCallback is set to the return value of that function." The way I read that this would set the callback function to the name 'true'. (So the url, observed in fiddler, would have '?callback=true' at the end). Does it? –  Patches Dec 29 '11 at 20:53
    
I think standardizing all your success code to the success function makes sense, but maybe that's just me. –  Josh Smith Dec 29 '11 at 20:58

You can make it work if you create a proxy to load the url for you.

$.ajax({
    url: 'proxy.php?url=http://www.geognos.com/api/en/countries/info/all.json',
    dataType: "json",
    success: function() {
        alert('JSON call succeeded!');
    }
});

Here proxy.php will load http://www.geognos.com/api/en/countries/info/all.json for you.

About the JSONP part, your syntax is invalid. See http://api.jquery.com/jQuery.ajax/ for more.

share|improve this answer
    
Using JSONP will solve the problem. This answer is incorrect. Introducing a proxy is over-architecting something that has a much simpler answer. –  Josh Smith Dec 29 '11 at 20:43
    
Oops! didin't check geognos.com supports jsonp. –  shiplu.mokadd.im Dec 29 '11 at 20:52

If you need to make a web service call to a domain that is not of the same origin (i.e base URL) you need to use a proxy to do so. proxies are not necessarily obligated to the same domain restrictions.

They are different depending on the platform you are working with, i.e .NET/LAMP.

This website has multiple posts on how to create either.

share|improve this answer

Here is an example of how you can fix this. By setting your jsoncallback.

$.ajax(url, { dataType: 'jsonp', jsonp: 'jsoncallback' })
    .then(function(data, status, xhr) {
        console.log(status);
        console.log('success (promises): ' + data.name);
}, function(xhr, status, error) {
    console.log('failed (promises): ' + error);
});
share|improve this answer

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