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I think that I am misunderstanding something about how jquery $(this) works. In my code below:

$(document).delegate(".ISBN_number", "change", 
        function()
        {
            var isbnNum = $(this).val();
            console.log("isbnNum = " + isbnNum);
            $.get("validate_isbn.php", {isbn: isbnNum},
                function(answer) 
                {                   
                    console.log("answer = " + answer);    //this does display the correct content
                    if (answer == true)
                    {   console.log("entered answer");
                        $(this).after("<img src='pics/green_checkmark.png' class='checkmark'>");
                    }
                    else 
                    {
                        $(this).after("nope");
                    }
            });             
    });

I am trying to select any input tag when its contents are changed. When I call $(this) in the code, I assumed that it would refer back to this input tag but it doesn't. What is my issue? Is it because I used .delegate? (I needed to use this because the input tags are generated dynamically later on, they don't exist in the original code.) How can I fix this?

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which $(this) are you referring to? there are like three of them, and two of them are probably in a wildly different context than you expect. –  32bitkid Dec 29 '11 at 20:50
    
I'm refering to the second (and third, though, I was only using that as a test) $(this) –  user1015214 Dec 29 '11 at 20:56

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you want to access this from the .delegate() call, then you have to save it into a local variable because this is set to something different in the completion function for the ajax call. You can do that like this:

$(document).delegate(".ISBN_number", "change", 
        function()
        {
            var self = this;
            var isbnNum = $(this).val();
            console.log("isbnNum = " + isbnNum);
            $.get("validate_isbn.php", {isbn: isbnNum},
                function(answer) 
                {                   
                    console.log("answer = " + answer);    //this does display the correct content
                    if (answer == true)
                    {   console.log("entered answer");
                        $(self).after("<img src='pics/green_checkmark.png' class='checkmark'>");
                    }
                    else 
                    {
                        $(self).after("nope");
                    }
            });             
    });
share|improve this answer
    
This is not really standard practice. Jasper has it right with caching $(this) specifically and prepending $ to know you're referring to a jQuery object. –  Josh Smith Dec 29 '11 at 20:55
    
@JoshSmith - var self = this; is very much a standard javascript practice, used by many people. Of course, if you only need $(this), then it's fine to cache that instead. Using $ in the var name of jQuery objects is a personal style which I know some people like, but I dislike as I find it lessens readability. –  jfriend00 Dec 29 '11 at 20:59
    
Perfect! Thanks for the explanation. –  user1015214 Dec 29 '11 at 21:01
    
It's not standard jQuery practice, was my point. –  Josh Smith Dec 29 '11 at 21:11
1  
@JoshSmith - I find that too many jQuery folks are obsessed with always using jQuery methods and will write code like this: $(this).attr("id") instead of this.id or $(this).val() instead of this.value when the jQuery way is multiple function calls instead of a single property reference. As such, I usually cache this rather than $(this) since it's the more fundamental value. But, full optimization for a particular situation depends upon the needs of the situation and caching $(this) works fine in this circumstance. –  jfriend00 Dec 29 '11 at 21:20

this (var isbnNum = $(this).val();) refers to the .ISBN_number element that had the change event fire on it. $(this) refers to that same DOM element wrapped in a jQuery object so you can call jQuery functions on it.

When you make an AJAX call or any other type of function call that uses an anonymous function it is good practice to cache the original this:

$(document).delegate(".ISBN_number", "change", 
        function()
        {
            var $this   = $(this),
                isbnNum = $this.val();
            console.log("isbnNum = " + isbnNum);
            $.get("validate_isbn.php", {isbn: isbnNum},
                function(answer) 
                {                   
                    console.log("answer = " + answer);    //this does display the correct content
                    if (answer == true)
                    {   console.log("entered answer");
                        $this.after("<img src='pics/green_checkmark.png' class='checkmark'>");
                    }
                    else 
                    {
                        $this.after("nope");
                    }
            });             
    });

That way you know you're always referring to the same this.

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Wow, edited at approximately the same time to add in caching. Good deal. –  Josh Smith Dec 29 '11 at 20:54
    
Also, +1 for good practice on the comma-separated vars. –  Josh Smith Dec 29 '11 at 20:56

$(this) refers to the current scope. In your case the first $(this) refers to the .ISBN_number, and the other $(this) are in a different scope.

You should be caching the first $(this) like so:

$(document).delegate(".ISBN_number", "change", 
    function()
    {
        $isbn = $(this);
        var isbnNum = $isbn.val();
        console.log("isbnNum = " + isbnNum);
        $.get("validate_isbn.php", {isbn: isbnNum},
            function(answer) 
            {                   
                console.log("answer = " + answer);    //this does display the correct content
                if (answer == true)
                {   console.log("entered answer");
                    $isbn.after("<img src='pics/green_checkmark.png' class='checkmark'>");
                }
                else 
                {
                    $isbn.after("nope");
                }
        });             
});
share|improve this answer
    
but why doesn't my code work? Is it because of the .after? I have used this same code elsewhere (where it is also adding info after the input element) and there it worked! –  user1015214 Dec 29 '11 at 20:52
    
In addition to what Josh said, I woiuld point you here to fully understand this keyword –  defau1t Dec 29 '11 at 20:52

this may change for code inside a callback function. However, you should be able to circumvent that by using a caching variable:

$(document).delegate(".ISBN_number", "change", function () {
    var $this = $(this);
    var isbnNum = $this.val();
    console.log("isbnNum = " + isbnNum);
    $.get("validate_isbn.php", {
        isbn: isbnNum
    }, function (answer) {
        console.log("answer = " + answer); //this does display the correct content 
        if (answer == true) {
            console.log("entered answer");
            $this.after("<img src='pics/green_checkmark.png' class='checkmark'>");
        } else {
            $this.after("nope");
        }
    });
});
share|improve this answer
    
or use the jquery Event object. api.jquery.com/category/events/event-object –  32bitkid Dec 29 '11 at 20:53
    
@32bitkid How would that be better, though? Using the event object leads to both longer code and more processing. –  Blazemonger Dec 29 '11 at 20:57
    
more processing? longer code? what? the event object is being passed to your closure whether you bind a variable to it or not... –  32bitkid Dec 29 '11 at 20:59
    
@32bitkid Please submit an answer with your intention, then. You and I must be thinking about different things. –  Blazemonger Dec 29 '11 at 21:06

If you have inputBox for ISBN number, #(this).val() gives you the value entered/changed in the text Box.

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