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I have a for loop in which I placed several if statements. The objective of these conditionals is to check divisibility of a number and then output a string if the number is divisible by 3. If the number is divisible by 5, another string will be outputted. However, if the number is divisible by both 3 and 5, an entirely different string will be outputted in its place instead of the other strings.

Here is my code:

for (i = 1; i <= file_int; i++){
     if (i % 3 == 0) {
        printf("Hoppity \n");
    }
    if (i % 5 == 0) {
        printf("Hophop \n");
    }
    if (i % 5 == 0 && i % 3 == 0) {
        printf("Hop \n");
    }   
}

As you can see, the last conditional doesn't quite work. What type of control construct should I use? else?

Thanks alot.

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3  
What do you mean "as you can see?" You showed code, but no output. The last if statement looks okay from here. –  Dan Fego Dec 29 '11 at 21:29
    
if does not form a loop. A loop is a closed thing where start and end meet at some point. Draw a sequence diagram, and you'll see. BTW, draw a sequence diagram for this code, too. –  thiton Dec 29 '11 at 21:31
9  
This is called "The fizz-buzz test" and is used as a basic screening in an interview to see if you know how to program at all. Unfortunately you're failing; you need to look up what else does in basic programming. It's also worth mentioning that if is not a loop, it's a conditional whose block gets executed at most once. –  Brian Roach Dec 29 '11 at 21:31
1  
Ah, the power of "else". –  That Chuck Guy Dec 29 '11 at 21:33
1  
This is the FizzBuzz problem: codinghorror.com/blog/2007/02/why-cant-programmers-program.html –  zvrba Dec 29 '11 at 21:36
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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted
for (i = 1; i <= file_int; i++){
    if (i % 5 == 0 && i % 3 == 0) {
        printf("Five and three\n");
    } else if (i % 3 == 0) {
        printf("Three\n");
    } else if (i % 5 == 0) {
        printf("Five\n");
    } else {
        printf("None of the conditions passed\n");
    }
}
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@Number7even If you find the above answer as a correct one, please confirm so by clicking on the tick mark next to the answer. Thanks! –  Sangeeth Saravanaraj Dec 30 '11 at 4:21
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An alternative solution, keeping closer to your original code. Although the else solution is indeed more efficient (and elegant).

for (i = 1; i <= file_int; i++){
    if (i % 3 == 0 && i % 5 != 0) {
        printf("Hoppity \n");
    }
    if (i % 5 == 0 && i % 3 != 0) {
        printf("Hophop \n");
    }
    if (i % 5 == 0 && i % 3 == 0) {
        printf("Hop \n");
    }   
}
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Powerful, no. Elegant, yes. –  Dave Dec 29 '11 at 22:02
    
@Dave: I would not really call that elegant, to me it is harder to read and parse by a human than the if-else equivalent (i.e. you need to check all the conditions against the rest to know that they are exclusive, that is no two messages will be printed) –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Dec 29 '11 at 23:05
    
@DavidRodríguez-dribeas He said else was more powerful. I'm saying else is more elegant –  Dave Dec 30 '11 at 1:13
    
I agree the else method is more elegant, though my intent was to point out that it is more efficient (for which powerful was the wrong word). Edited. –  The111 Dec 30 '11 at 1:40
    
@Dave: Sorry, I misunderstood you :) –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Dec 30 '11 at 10:52
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Just for the sake of it, and not recommending it, as it can be harder to read as it abuses conversions from bool to int:

int msg = (i % 3 == 0) + 2*(i % 5 == 0);
switch ( msg ) {
case 3:
   cout << "Multiple of 3 and 5";
case 2: 
   cout << "Multiple of 5";
case 1:
   cout << "Multiple of 3";
}

which can be further condensed into:

const char* msgs[] = { "", "Multiple 3", "Multiple 5", "Multiple 3 and 5" };
cout << msgs[ (i%3==0) + 2*(i%5==0) ];

Of course, both solutions are against the question itself, as they are not if constructs, but rather avoid the use of if in the first case, and branches in general in the second case.

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I would use else-ifs and make us of the fact that

(i % 5 == 0 && i % 3 == 0) <=> (i % 15 == 0):

for (i = 1; i <= file_int; i++){
  if (i % 15 == 0)
    printf("Hop \n");
  else if (i % 3 == 0)
    printf("Hoppity \n");
  else if (i % 5 == 0)
    printf("Hophop \n"); 
}

Of course you can also get away without using any control structures except the for-loop at all:

const char* values[15] = {"Hop \n", "", "", "Hoppity \n", "", 
                          "Hophop \n", "Hoppity \n", "", "", "Hoppity \n", 
                          "Hophop \n", "", "Hoppity \n", "", ""};
for (int i = 1; i <= 100; i++) 
  printf(values[i % 15]);

That solution is slightly insane for this example, but it shows how you can do things differently (and it's not so farfetched when writing code where you shall never ever have more then a certain number of branch paths in one function (overzealous coding conventions...)).

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