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I'm creating a new instance of Word using the Office interop by doing this:

var word = Microsoft.Office.Interop.Word.Application();
word.Visible = true;
word.Activate;

I can get a window handle like this:

var wordHandle = Process.GetProcessesByName("winword")[0].MainWindowHandle;

The problem is that code works on the assumption that there's no other instance of Word running. If there are multiple, it can't guarantee that the handle it returns is for the instance that I've launched. I've tried using GetForegroundWindow after detecting a WindowActivate event from my object but this is all running within a WPF application that's set to run as the topmost window, so I just get the handle to the WPF window. Are there any other ways to get the handle for my instance of word?

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Yes, don't do that. Whatever you want to do with that handle, surely there's a better way. –  Hans Passant Dec 29 '11 at 21:50

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Not sure why you need the handle to Word, but one way I've done this before is to actually change the Word window caption and search for it. I did this because I wanted to host the Word application inside a control, but that's another story. :)

  var word = new Microsoft.Office.Interop.Word.Application(); 
  word.Visible = true; 
  word.Activate();
  word.Application.Caption = "My Word";

  foreach( Process p in Process.GetProcessesByName( "winword" ) )
  {
    if( p.MainWindowTitle == "My Word" )
    {
      Debug.WriteLine( p.Handle.ToString() );
    }
  }

Once you got the handle, you can restore the caption if you like.

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Yeah, why I need to do this is another story as well. But I think your suggestion not only gets me where I'm going but actually makes the whole experience I'm going for a little nicer with the custom caption. –  HotN Dec 29 '11 at 22:15
    
Agree with Eddie Paz but with one change: you shoud check if( p.MainWindowTitle.Contains( "My Word" ) ) because word adds some other letters to the beginnig of that. –  user1556404 Jul 27 '12 at 1:28

You are already getting a list of all Word processes. You can iterate through this list, get the parent ID of each process and match is against the current process i.e. your own application that created a Word instance. This is roughly what I have in mind:

IntPtr getChildProcess(string childProcessName)
{
    var currentProcess = Process.GetCurrentProcess();

    var wordProcesses = Process.GetProcessesByName(childProcessName);
    foreach (var childProcess in wordProcesses)
    {
        var parentProcess = ProcessExtensions.Parent(childProcess);
        if (currentProcess.Id == parentProcess.Id)
            return currentProcess.Handle;
    }

    return IntPtr.Zero;
}

The ProcessExtensions class is available in this excellent response to an earlier post. I have used this class in my own code and have had no complaints.

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I'll leave the answer I've selected as correct, since it was what I found to work back when I wrote this. I've since needed to do do something similar for a different project and found that trying to update the application caption seemed to be less reliable (Office 2013 vs. 2010? Who knows...). Here's the new solution I've come up with that leaves window captions intact.

var startingProcesses = Process.GetProcessesByName("winword").ToList();

var word = new Microsoft.Office.Interop.Word.Application(); 

var allProcesses = Process.GetProcessesByName("winword").ToList();

var processDiff = allProcesses.Except(startingProcesses, new ProcessComparer());

var handle = processDiff.First().MainWindowHandle;

This uses the following custom comparer to ensure the processes match (found here).

class ProcessComparer : IEqualityComparer<Process>
{
    public bool Equals(Process x, Process y)
    {
        if (ReferenceEquals(x, y))
        {
            return true;
        }

        if (x == null || y == null)
        {
            return false;
        }

        return x.Id.Equals(y.Id);
    }

    public int GetHashCode(Process obj)
    {
        return obj.Id.GetHashCode();
    }
}
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