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How does Android OS handle permissions with native code running within an NDK compiled .apk? It seems to me that because the JNI is just calling upon native functions, the actual NATIVE portion of the code shouldn't be affected by Android permissions. For example, I am looking to develop an Android app (.apk) that writes a file under data/system. AOS already mounts data/system as RW so I've already been able to develop a native program that performs the write easily. My thinking is that when I implement this using the NDK, I will not have to set permissions to write to the directory because of the native implemenation. Is this assumption correct?

Thanks, David

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Fortunately there's no such an easy way for getting around with user granted permissions. Your assumption may apply to some of them but not all. –  harism Dec 29 '11 at 22:17

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My thinking is that when I implement this using the NDK, I will not have to set permissions to write to the directory because of the native implemenation. Is this assumption correct?

Absolutely not. Permissions affect everything in the process, no matter what programming language you choose to write in.

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Can you elaborate? This is what I know, the Activity Manager Service enforces all android permissions when an app makes an intent for a given activity. If you run native code through an app, how can it enforce these permissions? It seems to me that because the intent objects only exist on the Java level implementation, native code will bypass this whole process. I also thought that at the native level the only enforced permissions are done by the kernel, which prevent certain UID and GID's from accessing certain hardware... –  David Dec 30 '11 at 14:38
    
@David: "the Activity Manager Service enforces all android permissions when an app makes an intent for a given activity" -- no. Permissions have nothing much to do with Intents. "how can it enforce these permissions?" -- because the permissions are enforced where they are needed. "I also thought that at the native level the only enforced permissions are done by the kernel, which prevent certain UID and GID's from accessing certain hardware" -- while that may be done, there are plenty of kernel-level permission checks (e.g., INTERNET). –  CommonsWare Dec 30 '11 at 14:44
    
From further reading on developer.android.com it states "An Intent object is passed to Context.startActivity() or Activity.startActivityForResult() to launch an activity or get an existing activity to do something new". After examining the ActivityManagerService.java, after the AMS receives the intent to start an activity it calls upon the PackageManageService to check if the associated intent permission is located in packages.xml. We see that no activity is being launched when the application calls upon this native code, so can you elaborate on how these permissions are enforced? –  David Dec 30 '11 at 15:05
    

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