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I have some code where the timer EventHandler has this

void timer_Tick(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    try
    {
         timerRescan.Stop();
         ScanForIeInstances()
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
         log.Warn("Exception 3", ex);
    }
    finally
    {
        timerRescan.Start();
    }
}

Naturally there is a race condition with an external entity who may want to Stop the timer down....if the timer is in process and using a thread and someone calls timerRescan.Stop, the timer thread will call Start starting the timer back up again. I am trying to replace this code. There are two methods in java I know and I would like to know how to do both in C#

  1. Run a task every 5 seconds where 5 seconds is the distance between tasks firing
  2. Run a task and AFTER it ends+5seconds run the task again

I would like to use #2 and always fire 5 seconds from the END of the last firing of the event. How do I do that and which timer do I use in C# for that?

This then allows me to have a recurring timer, call start once and have no race condition with the stop(I would rather not have to implement synchronization though I know I could do that as a last resort...would rather just keep the code clean like I can in java)

OR IF you know java, what I am simply looking for is the equivalent of ScheduledExecutorService.scheduleAtFixedRate - start to start ScheduledExecutorService.scheduleWithFixedDelay - end to start

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Have you considered Quartz.NET? quartznet.sourceforge.net –  M.Babcock Dec 30 '11 at 0:01
    
If Quartz.NET is too heavy for your needs, isn't that what the Timer.AutoReset property is intended to do for you? –  M.Babcock Dec 30 '11 at 0:29
    
asked on the quartz list, but someone else on that list said they don't have that. –  Dean Hiller Jan 3 '12 at 16:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

A quick way to handle this is to have the external entity set a flag, and then check to see whether that flag has been set:

public bool StopRequested {get; set;}

void timer_Tick(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    if (timerRescan != null) timerRescan.Stop();
    if (StopRequested) return;
    try
    {
         ScanForIeInstances()
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
         log.Warn("Exception 3", ex);
    }
    finally
    {
        timerRescan.Start();
    }
}

This doesn't solve the problem if the external entity has a handle on the timer, but the timer should probably be private anyway.

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I was hoping to avoid the work and delete code to keep it cleaner like I could in java, alas, oh well. –  Dean Hiller Jan 3 '12 at 16:22

If your only concern is that an external source may want to stop the timer, your best bet is to write a wrapper around this timer that checks a semaphore of sorts....

I have not done any testing of this, but you should be able to grasp the general idea.

public class TimerWrapper
{
  public event EventHandler Elapsed;
  private System.Timers.Timer timer;
  private System.Threading.ManualResetEvent stopped;
  private object lockObject = new object();

  public TimerWrapper(double interval)
  {
    stopped = new System.Threading.ManualResetEvent(false);
    timer = new System.Timers.Timer(interval);
    timer.Elapsed += new System.Timers.ElapsedEventHandler(timer_Elapsed);
    timer.Start();
  }

  void timer_Elapsed(object sender, System.Timers.ElapsedEventArgs e)
  {
    lock (lockObject)
    {
      timer.Stop();
      try
      {
        Elapsed(this, new EventArgs());
      }
      finally
      {
        if (!stopped.WaitOne(0)) timer.Start();
      }
    }
  }

  public void Start()
  {
    stopped.Reset();
    lock (lockObject)
    {
      timer.Start();
    }
  }

  public void Stop()
  {
    stopped.Set();
    lock (lockObject)
    {
      timer.Stop();
    }
  }
}
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