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C# 2008 SP1

I am using this code below:

dt.ReadXml("%AppData%\\DateLinks.xml");

However, I am getting an exception that point to the location of where my application is running from:

Could not find a part of the path 'D:\Projects\SubVersionProjects\CatDialer\bin\Debug\%AppData%\DateLinks.xml'.

I thought the %AppData% should find the relative path. When I go 'Start|Run|%AppData% windows explorer takes me to that directory.

I can not put the full path in, as the user is different on each client machine.

Many thanks for any advice,

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6 Answers 6

up vote 327 down vote accepted

To get the AppData directory, it's best to use the GetFolderPath method:

Environment.GetFolderPath(Environment.SpecialFolder.ApplicationData)

%AppData% is an environment variable, and they are not automatically expanded anywhere in .NET, although you can explicitly use the Environment.ExpandEnvironmentVariable method to do so. I would still strongly suggest that you use GetFolderPath however, because as Johannes Rössel points out in the comment, %AppData% may not be set in certain circumstances.

Finally, to create the path as shown in your example:

var fileName = Path.Combine(Environment.GetFolderPath(
    Environment.SpecialFolder.ApplicationData), "DateLinks.xml")
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19  
+1 for offering a real solution, not relying on the environment. To add to the answer: Not every function that handles file names expands environment variables. In fact, usually you have to explicitly do this, otherwise it doesn't work and you'll end up with %something% folders. Furthermore, the environment does not need to be present, in some cases when running a program under another user account the user's environment will not be loaded and %Appdata% will be empty. That's why you would want to use the documented APIs for getting those folders (unless you're using batch files, though). –  Joey May 15 '09 at 8:06
    
@Johannes: Good info there. I just amended my answer as you posted that, but I'll make it clearer that GetFolderPath is definitely preferable over ExpandEnvironmentVariable. –  Noldorin May 15 '09 at 8:11
    
+1 for Environment.GetFolderPath(Environment.SpecialFolder.ApplicationData), I was behind this for couple of days now. –  Sumit Ghosh May 28 '10 at 13:43
    
For some reason Environment.GetFolderPath(Environment.SpecialFolder.ApplicationData) returns empty string for me (IIS 7, VS 2011). Problem solved using Simon_Weaver solution - mapping using MapPath. –  Mike Keskinov May 21 '12 at 19:16
9  
FYI that gives the Roaming directory for local AppData Environment.GetFolderPath(Environment.SpecialFolder.LocalApplicationData) –  Miau Jul 4 '12 at 11:21

The path is different if you're talking ASP.NET.

I couldn't find any of the 'SpecialFolder' values that pointed to /App_Data for ASP.NET.

Instead you need to do this:

 HttpContext.Current.ApplicationInstance.Server.MapPath("~/App_Data")

(Note: You don't need the 'Current' property in an MVC Controller)

If theres another more 'abstract' way to get to App_Data would love to hear how.

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Thank you, it works! –  Mike Keskinov May 21 '12 at 19:15

In .net2.0 you can use the variable Application.UserAppDataPath

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12  
This is Winforms only. –  Will Jul 1 '11 at 20:30

You can also use

Environment.ExpandEnvironmentVariables("%AppData%\\DateLinks.xml");

to expand the %AppData% variable.

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The BEST way to use the AppData directory, IS to use Environment.ExpandEnvironmentVariable method.

Reasons:

  • it replaces parts of your string with valid directories or whatever
  • it is case-insensitive
  • it is easy and uncomplicated
  • it is a standard
  • good for dealing with user input

Examples:

string path;
path = "%AppData%\stuff";
path = "%aPpdAtA%\HelloWorld";
path = "%progRAMfiLES%\Adobe;%appdata%\FileZilla"; // collection of paths

path = Environment.ExpandEnvironmentVariables(path);
Console.WriteLine(path);

Remember some users type %AppData%, some %appdata% and some %APpData% You don't want to end up with:

if (path.ToLower().StartsWith("%appdata%"))
    ; // path manipulation
if (path.ToLower().StartsWith("%programfiles%"))
    ; // path manipulation

If the environment variable is not set, it is not your fault (besides when it IS). I usually don't tell people to not re-invent the wheel but after I first went the other way and realized that it was a bad idea.

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I don't think putting %AppData% in a string like that will work.

try

Environment.GetFolderPath(Environment.SpecialFolder.ApplicationData).ToString()
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