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What's the difference between a graphical shell and a desktop environment? I keep hearing how

GNOME 3, KDE Plasma Shell and Unity are shells.

and how GNOME 2, XFCE and LXDE are desktop environments.

Is it that the interface is the Shell and all the rest of the software is the desktop environment, if this where true wouldn't that make GNOME Panel a shell?

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"Desktop environment" is the whole shebang. The [GUI] "shell" is just that bit: background, taskbar, context menus, etc (varies, of course). The "shell" for Windows is "explorer.exe" but Windows is a "desktop environment". – user166390 Dec 30 '11 at 2:35
    
OK makes sense so would the file manager nautilus be a shell also? – zeitue Dec 30 '11 at 2:39
1  
Generally file managers are not [GUI] shells: e.g. they can [often] be run without the shell (or with a different shell). (However, it is quite possible that a file-manager acted as a shell.) In the case of [modern] Windows the same executable is used, but perhaps hosted in a different process and it serves a different purpose. (Windows 3.1 had a separate "FileMan" program.) – user166390 Dec 30 '11 at 3:14
    
OK that explains everything I wish you would have posted an answer instead of comments through. – zeitue Dec 30 '11 at 5:03
up vote 9 down vote accepted

"Desktop environment" (DE) is the whole shebang. The "desktop shell", on the other hand, is just the bit that provides the background, task-bar, desktop icons, desktop context menus: generally the "home" interface for a particular DE. (The functionality/scope of the shell can vary greatly as well as include and/or overlap the roles of a Window Manager, especially in an X-based system.) The "shell" for Windows is "explorer.exe" but Windows itself is the "desktop environment".

Generally file managers, like Nautilus, are not [desktop] shells: e.g. they can [often] be run without the standard "shell" (or with a different shell). However, it is quite possible that a file-manager acted as a shell. In the case of [modern] Windows the same executable is used for both the shell and the file-manager, but perhaps hosted in a different process, and yet it serves a different purpose in both roles. (Windows 3.1 had a separate FileMan program.)

Happy exploring.

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Desktop environments, such as Explorer, ARE graphical shells because they provide an interface for users to access the services of the kernel.

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