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I am in the process of designing an auction like web application using Rails 3.1 and MySQL 5.1. The users will have account balances, hence it is important, that someone doesn't bid for an auction item if he has insufficient funds.

Obviously I will be packing "winning" of an auction into a transaction, goes something like this:

Transaction 1:

ActiveRecord::Base.transaction do
    a = Account.where(:id=>session[:user_id]).first
    # now comes a long part of code with various calculations and other table updates, i.e. time pases
    a.balance -= the_price_of_the_item
    a.save!
end

By the way, I am curerntly using optimistic locking, hence all my table have the column lock_version.

While such a transaction is being executed, the user could via another input place other bids, hence whenever they place a bid, a piece of code checks if the current available balance is sufficient

Same here again:

Transaction 2:

ActiveRecord::Base.transaction do
    a = Account.where(:id=>session[:user_id]).first
    raise ActiveRecord::Rollback if a.balance < the_price_of_the_bid + Bids.get_total_bid_value_for_user(session[:user_id])
    # now process the bid saving
end

Obviously I need to ensure, that the two transactions do not overlap, otherwise transaction 2 might be reading the balance while transaction 1 is in the midst of processing and I end up with a negative account balance (the bid gets saved and afterwards transaction 1 commits, then the user has possibly bid with funds he does not have anymore).

One thing to note is, that the transaction 2 does not make any changes to the Account, it merely reads the account. I guess it comes down to the question: How to prevent any reads for selected SELECT statements while running transaction 1.

How do I make transaction 2 wait for transaction 1 to complete? Is it possible with optimistic locking and one of the available MySQL transaction isolation levels or do I need to use pessimistic locking here? If pesimistic locking is the only answer would adding a.lock! after reading the account record in each of the two transactions be sufficient?

Design criterias are of course

  • I am looking for the most performant solution even if it means more coding.
  • data consistency is of utmost importance
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Just trying to understand your data. Say someone has a balance of 10. Can they create 2 bids of 10 each (at this point we don't know if either or any will win)? If they can't, how do you track this? –  Frederick Cheung Dec 30 '11 at 4:27
    
No they cant, otherwise I take the risk that they win both bids and that would result in a balance of -10 on their accounts. The tracking is done in Transaction 2, it checks for the available balance and only of the user has enough money on the account, then his bid will be accepted and saved. –  Kumala Dec 30 '11 at 4:39
    
So that code also goes and checks whether there are any currently open bids? (or does the account balance reflect that) –  Frederick Cheung Dec 30 '11 at 4:49
    
The balance keeps track only of the actual balance. After the line: raise ActiveRecord::Rollback if a.balance < the_price_of_the_bid there would be further code to check additionally the existing open bids by reading the Bids table (which in return might include the bid that is being processed in transaction 1). –  Kumala Dec 30 '11 at 5:16

2 Answers 2

I interpret your question in the following way.

  1. An Account has a balance
  2. An Account has many Bids
  3. A Bid has a value
  4. A Bid which has neither won, nor lost, is "Open"
  5. When a Big is won, its value is deducted from the balance of the Account.
  6. A Bid can only be made, if the sum of values for "Open" Bids is less than the balance.

As such you have identified the transactions that matter.

  1. Placing a bid
  2. Winning a bid

This is how I'd do it.

1.

account = Account.find_by_id(session[:user_id])
# maybe do some stuff here

transaction do
  account.lock!

  bid_amount = account.bids.open.sum(:value)
  if bid_amount + this_value > account.balance
    raise "you're broke, mate"
  end

  account.bid.create!(:value => this_value)
end

We hold a row lock on the Account for a short while, but assuming you're using the right database, this should be okay.

Assuming the first bit was right, then the next is much easier

2.

class Bid
  def win!
    transaction do
      account.lock!
      account.decrement(:balance, self.value)
      account.save!
      close!
    end
  end
end

Notably if you did a SQL update SET balance = balance - ? you wouldn't need to do a lock on the 2nd one.

But generally, do the lock around the minimal section of code.

Realistically, you shouldn't have a lock for more than 100ms.

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I think there is a risk of "dirty reads" here in part 1: You read the account balance before the transaction starts, thus if another process updates the account balance beween account = Account.find_by_id(session[:user_id]) and transaction do account.lock! then if bid_amount + this_value > account.balance will be incorrect. In other words if Part 2. is executed between PArt 1.'s Find and Lock, then Part 1 is working with the wrong account balance. Isn't it? –  Kumala Dec 31 '11 at 8:35
    
I believe the lock! does a reload, hence reloading the balance at that time. –  Matthew Rudy Jan 3 '12 at 16:14
    
lock! absolutely does a reload: github.com/rails/rails/blob/master/activerecord/lib/… –  mrm Jan 21 '13 at 7:05
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Having spend now almost 10 hours non-stop reading various posts and documents as well as trial and erroring using the Rails console, I want to summarize my findings:

Optimistic locking: Is of no use to address my requirements, the locking only kicks in if I actually save the account balance record. But placing a bid does not update the account record so it wont trigger the optimistic locking, unless I maintain a field in the account record that tracks my current committed funds for all open bids and hence will update the account record upon bid placement (which I dont want to do as it will require another DB update whenever a bid gets saved).

So that leaves me only with Pesimistic locking. For simplicity purposes I decided to put a lock on the User record, thus the code for my transaction 1 is changed to:

Transaction 1:

ActiveRecord::Base.transaction do     
    u = User.find(session[:user_id],:lock=>true)
    a = Account.where(:id=>session[:user_id]).first 
    a.balance -= the_price_of_the_item
    ... some more code here ...
    a.save!      
end      

and transaction 2:

ActiveRecord::Base.transaction do
    u = User.find(session[:user_id],:lock=>true)
    raise ActiveRecord::Rollback if a.balance < the_price_of_the_bid + Bids.get_total_bid_value_for_user(session[:user_id])          
    # now process the bid saving
    ....
end

In addition I decided to set the MySQL transaction isolation level to SERIALIZABLE.

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