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What does the assignment of super init to self do?

I have seen using this method can any one explain me in detail how this work

- (id)initWithBaseObject:(CPObject)aBaseObject
{
    if(self = [super init])
    {
        _baseObject = aBaseObject;

    }
    return self;
}
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marked as duplicate by Caleb, Tim Post Dec 31 '11 at 21:45

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1 Answer 1

- (id)initWithBaseObject:(CPObject)aBaseObject
{

This is an initializer that takes an argument of type CPObject, whatever that is.

if(self = [super init])
{

This is a common idiom in Objective-C initializers. The call to [super init] give the superclass's initializer a shot at initializing the object, and it returns a pointer to the object initialized by the superclass. It's possible that that call will return a different object than the one that was previously allocated, and if that's the case the superclass will also have released the allocated object. We therefore need to assign this return value to self. The result of the assignment is the same as the thing being assigned, i.e. the result of [super init], so we can use the assignment as the condition for the if. If super returned something that's not nil, then we'll go on to do any necessary initialization.

    _baseObject = aBaseObject;

This is the aforementioned necessary initialization. In this case, we're storing the value of aBaseObject in _baseObject. (It's typical to not define separate types for pointers, so if CPObject is defined to be something like CObject*, it'd be more traditional to just use CObject* instead.)

    }
    return self;
}

Initializers always return a pointer to the thing that they initialized, i.e. self.

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