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I'm a bit confused by the viewport mets tag, for use in mobile devices:

<meta name="viewport" content="width=1024, initial-scale=1.4, maximum-scale-1.6, minimum-scale=0.25"/>
.

What does this thing mean? I mean, I get what a view port is... it is a magical hole that you can look at a fixed-size object with. And I get that you might want to give the hole a width, because then you can determine how much of the fixed-size image you can see at a time.

But why also give it an initial scale? What is the point? Why not just set the viewport to whatever value you want it to be? What does the initial-scale add?

Also, what do the max and min values add? Why wouldn't i want the user to be able to scale as they see fit (assuming i don't disable the scaling with the 'user-scalabe=no' optional entry)?

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1 Answer 1

As per Apple, you do not need to explicitly set the viewport width...If you just specify an initial-scale of 1, Safari assumes width=device-width in portrait mode...

The scale just controls the zoom level of the page...If you have designed your site for a particular fixed width/height, you might not want the user to be able to zoom in or out..

You can checkout the following links for more info

http://developer.apple.com/library/IOs/ipad/#documentation/AppleApplications/Reference/SafariWebContent/UsingtheViewport/UsingtheViewport.html

Do remember that viewport mainly affects the mobile browsers only..

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This doesn't quite answer the question - why would i ever use the initial-scale value? I can control if they can scale with one of the viewport attributes, and i can control how much they can zoom in or out with another two - but i don't know why anyone is setting initial-scale –  bharal Jan 12 '12 at 18:09

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