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I have learned that browsers can only load a few files from the same domain at the same time. Therefor you should place your images on a different domain, or on a subdomain, to speed up page performance. Something like that...

Is it worth building websites like this or will browsers change this function soon? Or maybe they allredy have?

Or maybe better asked: When will it be unneccessary to load your images from other domains for page performance?

The websites I am buling will not have there images hosted on a CDN...

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

The browser limits the concurrent HTTP connections to a single server for the server's sake. While the limits have been increased in most browsers over time, there will always be limitations in web development and if you're a serious web developer you should suck it up and adopt the current best practices for working within them.

Without hosting your images on a CDN you can reduce the number of requests by combining your images into CSS sprites when appropriate. Check out the logo on StackOverflow, for example :)

Also, combine your CSS and Javascript into single files for production deployments.

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You can use a subdomain like static.example.com to serve static files like images and videos. The advantage of such a usage will be on server side where you serve static.example.com from a fast server like nginx while keeping the example.com proxied to apache. As a result of this client will be able to download these static resources faster since they are served faster.

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