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i have trouble implementing policy based, time based and customer based pricing for our SKUs (Stock keeping units). So far i have created following table for time based pricing

 SKUPrices  
ID Pk  
SKUID FK_To_Sku  
DateFrom  
DateTo  
Price

I believe this schema can handle time based pricing well (i need community review on it though) but i can not figure out how to handle customer based pricing (if we want to sell few skus to some customers at subsidized rates for some time period) and policy based pricing (where subsidized rates will be applied to skus if sold under some policy for some time period).

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What if there are conflicting prices for a SKU? Do you pick based on the highest/lowest price? – Anurag Dec 30 '11 at 9:44
    
price at some specific time period will be unique as we will ensure to keep Time periods to be non overlapping. – Muhammad Adeel Zahid Dec 30 '11 at 9:48
    
Can a policy AND a customer pricing be in effect on the same SKU at the SAME time? If not, then adding customerID and PolicyID to the SKUPrices table seems to solve the problem. This assumes that business rules are in place indicating what ORDER to pick them in when a customer buys something, or perhaps the organization simply follows the cheapest method; in which case since there could be 3 different choices, the system would pick the min(Price) for the date range in question assuming the customer was eligible for both customer and policy based prices. – xQbert Dec 30 '11 at 10:00
    
yes customer and policy based pricing can be in effect at the same time – Muhammad Adeel Zahid Dec 30 '11 at 10:22
    
So for example: A base price for SKU 1234 is 12.50 between 1/1/2012 00:00:00 and 1/31/2012 23:59:59. customer pricing of 11.50 for customer A & B is in effect for SKU 1234 between 1/15/2012 00:00:00 and 1/31/2012 23:59:59 a Policy for SKU 1234 states to reduce prices by another 10% for purchases between 1/24/2012 00:00:00 and 1/31/2012 23:59:59. if a purchase is made on 1/1/2012 it's 12.50. made on 1/16/2012 it's 11:50 for customers A B, 12:50 for all else. If purchase on 1/30/2012 by customer A/B it's 11.50-10% everyone else it's 12.50-10%. IS this correct? – xQbert Dec 30 '11 at 11:06
up vote 2 down vote accepted

A very easy way to implement the above requirements would be to just add 2 more columns like this:

SKUPrices
------------------
ID Pk  
SKUID FK_To_Sku
CustomerId FK_to_Customer
PolicyId FK_to_Policy  
DateFrom  
DateTo  
Price

Then you could just provide default values for customer and policy ids (NULL or 0), if you want to enter date based values. Add the customer or policy FKs, if you want to store customer or policy specific prices.

It's a quite simple price storing schema, but it may suffice for your needs. You might also want to take care of price scales (different prices at different quantities) or other needs. Maybe you can already address this through your policies, I don't know.

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is this schema properly normalized? – Muhammad Adeel Zahid Dec 30 '11 at 10:33
    
It's not absolutely normalized (as Mark Bannister already pointed out). But, I used both approaches (this one and and the multiple table one proposed by Mark) and must say that it's always a hassle to deal with multiple tables when having to get the price. This will be mostly a lookup table so I'm going with "don't normalize at all cost". – MicSim Dec 30 '11 at 14:05
    
One more addition: Database design always depends on your current and future requirements. You have to always think about what requirements are probably going to hit you in the future. That's what should drive your decision to one or the other schema. – MicSim Dec 30 '11 at 14:10

Set up separate tables for Customer and Policy-based pricing:

CustomerPrices
------------------
ID Pk  
SKUID FK_To_Sku
CustomerId FK_to_Customer
DateFrom  
DateTo  
Price

PolicyPrices
------------------
ID Pk  
SKUID FK_To_Sku
PolicyId FK_to_Policy  
DateFrom  
DateTo  
Price

Include checks on the customer and policy-pricing tables when calculating prices by separate left outer joins to each table.

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please explain a little bit why we should create two tables instead of one and what are drawbacks if i go with MicSim solution – Muhammad Adeel Zahid Dec 30 '11 at 11:07
    
It's actually three tables - these two are in addition to your original SKUPrices table. MicSim's solution is improperly normalised, since you will have Prices that are dependant on Customers and/or Policies in the same table as those that are dependant on SKU alone. – Mark Bannister Dec 30 '11 at 11:19

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