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Is there any way to read specific bytes from an file?

For example, I have the following code to read all the bytes of the file

byte[] test = File.ReadAllBytes(file);

I want to read the bytes from offset 50 to offset 60 and put them in an array.

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7 Answers 7

up vote 11 down vote accepted

LINQ Version:

byte[] test = File.ReadAllBytes(file).Skip(50).Take(10).ToArray();
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9  
Here all file content will be read and then only 10 bytes will be used. Not very optimal approach :) –  the_joric Dec 30 '11 at 11:56
    
@the_joric However a helper that given a filename returned a lazy IEnumerable<byte> in place of File.ReadAllBytes would be an effective approach, especially if reading an arbitrary run of bytes from a file was a common need. –  Richard Dec 30 '11 at 13:51

This should do it

var data = new byte[10];
int actualRead;

using (FileStream fs = new FileStream("c:\\MyFile.bin", FileMode.Open))
{
    fs.Position = 50;

    actualRead = 0;

 do {
        actualRead += fs.Read(data, actualRead, 10-actualRead );
    } 
    while (actualRead != 10 && fs.Position < fs.Length);
}

Upon completion, data would contain 10 bytes between file's offset of 50 and 60, and actualRead would contain a number from 0 to 10, indicating how many bytes were actually read (this is of interest when the file has at least 50 but less than 60 bytes). If the file is less than 50 bytes, you will see EndOfStreamException.

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1  
You are meant to always check the return value of Read and loop as necessary. It is legal for Read to return 1 even when another 20000 bytes are available. –  Marc Gravell Dec 30 '11 at 11:36
    
From FilStream.Read on MSDN: " An implementation is free to return fewer bytes than requested even if the end of the stream has not been reached." –  Marc Gravell Dec 30 '11 at 11:43
    
The important thing is: the documentation explicitly reserved that right: so - I you don't, you aren't following the published API –  Marc Gravell Dec 30 '11 at 11:50
    
You edit will loop forever if there is not enough data –  Marc Gravell Dec 30 '11 at 11:51
1  
seeking to a pos after the end of the file and attempting to read causes an infinite loop. To solve, change the while condition from "fs.Position != fs.Length" to "fs.Position < fs.Length" –  OSH Sep 23 '12 at 16:01

Create a BinaryReader, read 10 bytes starting at byte 50:

byte[] test = new byte[10];
using (BinaryReader reader = new BinaryReader(new FileStream(file, FileMode.Open)))
{
    reader.BaseStream.Seek(50, SeekOrigin.Begin);
    reader.Read(test, 0, 10);
}
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1  
Stream.Seek method takes two arguments. It should be reader.BaseStream.Seek(50, SeekOrigin.Begin); –  Tajomaru Sep 6 '13 at 10:51
    
Good catch, fixed. –  Robert Rouhani Sep 6 '13 at 12:57
    
best and simplest answer! thanks –  knocte Jan 13 at 19:34

You need to:

  • seek to the data you want
  • call Read repeatedly, checking the return value, until you have all the data you need

For example:

public static byte[] ReadBytes(string path, int offset, int count) {
    using(var file = File.OpenRead(path)) {
        file.Position = offset;
        offset = 0;
        byte[] buffer = new byte[count];
        int read;
        while(count > 0  &&  (read = file.Read(buffer, offset, count)) > 0 )
        {
            offset += read;
            count -= read;
        }
        if(count < 0) throw new EndOfStreamException();
        return buffer;     
    }
}
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using System.IO;

public static byte[] ReadFile(string filePath)
{
    byte[] buffer;
    FileStream fileStream = new FileStream(filePath, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read);
    try
    {
        buffer = new byte[length];            // create buffer
        fileStream.Read(buffer, 50, 10);
     }
     finally
     {
         fileStream.Close();
     }
     return buffer;
 }
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2  
The "offset" in the call to Read is the offset in the buffer, not the offset in the stream –  Marc Gravell Dec 30 '11 at 11:37

You can use filestream to and then call read

string pathSource = @"c:\tests\source.txt";

using (FileStream fsSource = new FileStream(pathSource,
    FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read))
{

    // Read the source file into a byte array.
    byte[] bytes = new byte[fsSource.Length];
    int numBytesToRead = 10;
    int numBytesRead = 50;
    // Read may return anything from 0 to numBytesToRead.
    int n = fsSource.Read(bytes, numBytesRead, numBytesToRead);
}

Check this example MSDN

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numBytesRead is the offset, the arguments goes (buffer,offset,count) –  Omar Qaddoumi Dec 30 '11 at 11:39
    
You are correct, removing vote. –  Richard Dec 30 '11 at 11:41
    
thank you very much :) –  Omar Qaddoumi Dec 30 '11 at 11:42
1  
On the other hand, the second param of FileStream.Read is the offset into the array passed as the first parameter and not the offset in the file. So actually I was correct! :-) (As it stands the code will throw because index 50 is beyond the end of bytes.) –  Richard Dec 30 '11 at 11:45
    
You are right thanks for the tip, Fixed. –  Omar Qaddoumi Dec 30 '11 at 11:58
byte[] a = new byte[60];
byte[] b = new byte[10];
Array.Copy( a ,50, b , 0 , 10 );
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-1: The Q is about reading bytes from a file. –  Richard Dec 30 '11 at 11:32
    
ONLY because you edited the question...In the OP this was not clear. –  Adrian Dec 30 '11 at 11:35
    
I suggest you look at my edit. The file requirement was there (and I didn't change the title). –  Richard Dec 30 '11 at 11:37
    
thanks to every one who helped me . my regards –  Ahmed T.R Dec 30 '11 at 12:04

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