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I have a base interface class:

class A
{
public:
    ITask(){}
    virtual bool Start()=0;
    virtual void Update()=0;
    virtual void Stop()=0;
};

I now have 2 other classes, that inherit from this

#include "A.h"
#include "C.h"
class B: public A
{
public:
    bool Start(){} 
    void Update()
    {
        c.Start();
    } 
    void Stop(){}

    static bool m_run;

    static void SetRun(bool run)
    {
        m_run = run;
    }
private:
    C c;
};

lastly I have a 3rd class:

#include "A.h"
#include "B.h"
class C : public A
{
public:
    bool Start()
    {
        B::SetRun(false); // cant do this
        B::m_run = false; // or this
    }
    void Update()
    {

    }
    void Stop()
    {

    }
}

I have shaved down some of the code, for simplicity.

I dont understand why I cant access the static var in B. Do I need to make it a pointer or a ref?

I get 2 errors:

error C2653: 'B' : is not a class or namespace name
error C3861: 'm_run': identifier not found
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2  
No-repo after fixing some typo and other minor mistakes. ideone.com/7RTdJ. Please show the actual code. –  KennyTM Dec 30 '11 at 11:31
    
It does not look like these are your complete files, because B.h is missing an include of A.h, and the capitalization of SetRun is different between B.h and C.h. Could you please update the question with your actual files that we could copy-paste into files and try to compile locally? –  dasblinkenlight Dec 30 '11 at 11:33

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Although you don't show it, I'm assuming that B.h includes C.h; otherwise the line C c; won't compile. This causes a circular dependency in the header files: B.h must be included before C.h, which must be included before B.h, which is impossible.

The easiest solution is to move the body of C::Start out of the definition of C, so that C.h does not need to include B.h. The function definition can go into a source file, or a separate header if you want to keep it inline.

Alternatively, you could modify B to contain a std::unique_ptr<C> rather than an instance of C, and implement a constructor (in a source file, or a separate header) that initialises it with new C. Then B.h only needs to forward declare class C; rather than including C.h.

A better solution, if possible, would be to rethink the relationships between the classes so that there isn't a circular dependency.

(UPDATE: while I was writing this answer, the question changed to show that B.h does indeed include C.h as I guessed.)

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There is nothing wrong with your example code (after the edits), the problem must be somewhere else, like a failed include.

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I think it might be do do with the private var C c in B.h –  PoiXen Dec 30 '11 at 11:55
    
Obviously, you can't declare c in B.h, because class C is not known at that point, but that is a different compiler error –  stefaanv Dec 30 '11 at 11:59
    
If you made the right include for C c, then that could explain the failed include, so B is not known (mutual dependency) –  stefaanv Dec 30 '11 at 12:00
    
Just made an edit in class B (include C.h) is this the problem? –  PoiXen Dec 30 '11 at 12:14
    
Yes, now it is clear: 2 header files can't include each other. This can be fixed by defining C::Start in a source file –  stefaanv Dec 30 '11 at 12:21

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