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Say I have two tables msg for messages and mnc for mobile network codes. They share no relations. But I want to join them

SELECT msg.message,
    msg.src_addr,
    msg.dst_addr,
    mnc.name,
FROM "msg"
JOIN "mnc"
ON array_to_string(regexp_matches(msg.src_addr || '+' || msg.dst_addr, '38(...)'), '') = mnc.code

But query fails with error:

psql:marketing.sql:28: ERROR:  argument of JOIN/ON must not return a set
LINE 12: ON array_to_string(regexp_matches(msg.src_addr || '+' || msg...

Is there a way to do such join? Or am I moving wrong way?

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2  
This is likely to be extremely inefficient (not using indexes, having to compare every single row). –  ThiefMaster Dec 30 '11 at 11:48
1  
@TheifMaster, not necessarily, it could use function based indexes such as how upper is mentioned here –  xQbert Dec 30 '11 at 11:56
    
@z4y4ts, Is there something significant about the regular expression 38(...) or is it just there as an example of a regular expression? As far as I can see, it just looks for any occurence of 38 followed by any 3 other characters. –  Mark Bannister Dec 30 '11 at 12:13

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

As @Milen already mentioned regexp_matches() is probably the wrong function for your purpose. You want a simple regular expression match (~). Actually, the LIKE operator (~~) will be faster:

Presumably fastest with LIKE

SELECT msg.message
      ,msg.src_addr
      ,msg.dst_addr
      ,mnc.name
FROM   mnc
JOIN   msg ON msg.src_addr ~~ ('%38' || mnc.code || '%')
           OR msg.dst_addr ~~ ('%38' || mnc.code || '%')
WHERE  length(mnc.code) = 3

In addition, you only want mnc.code of exactly 3 characters.


With regexp

You could write the same with regular expressions but it will most definitely be slower. Here is a working example close to your original:

SELECT msg.message
      ,msg.src_addr
      ,msg.dst_addr
      ,mnc.name
FROM   mnc
JOIN   msg ON (msg.src_addr || '+' || msg.dst_addr) ~ (38 || mnc.code)
           AND length(mnc.code) = 3

This also requires msg.src_addr and msg.dst_addr to be NOT NULL.

The second query demonstrates how the additional check length(mnc.code) = 3 can go into the JOIN condition or a WHERE clause. Same effect here.


With regexp_matches()

You could make this work with regexp_matches():

SELECT msg.message
      ,msg.src_addr
      ,msg.dst_addr
      ,mnc.name
FROM   mnc
JOIN   msg ON EXISTS (
    SELECT * 
    FROM   regexp_matches(msg.src_addr ||'+'|| msg.dst_addr, '38(...)', 'g') x(y)
    WHERE  y[1] = mnc.code
    )

But it will be slow in comparison - or so I assume.

Explanation:
Your regexp_matches() expression just returns an array of all captured substrings of the first match. As you only capture one substring (one pair of brackets in your pattern), you will exclusively get arrays with one element.

You get all matches with the additional "globally" switch 'g' - but in multiple rows. So you need a sub-select to test them all (or aggregate). Put that in an EXISTS - semi-join and you arrive at what you wanted.

Maybe you can report back with a performance test of all three? Use EXPLAIN ANALYZE for that.

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1  
Hi @erwin, thank you for solid answer. Here are some performance numbers gist.github.com/1691021 Just as you said, query with LIKE is the fastest one, followed by regexp and regexp_matches(). No surprises though, but I think real numbers can be interesting. –  z4y4ts Jan 27 '12 at 21:32
    
@z4y4ts: Thanks for the feedback. Exactly as expected, but it's always good to verify. :) –  Erwin Brandstetter Jan 27 '12 at 23:12

Your immediate problem is that regexp_matches could return one or more rows.

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Actually, without the 'g' switch, regexp_matches() returns exactly 1 row with an array of all captured substrings of the first match. However, the OP would need the 'g' switch to get that result for all matches. –  Erwin Brandstetter Dec 30 '11 at 17:14
    
It could return multiple rows and that's what's important to the parser hence the error message. –  Milen A. Radev Dec 30 '11 at 17:42

Try using "substring" instead, which extracts a substring given a regex pattern.

SELECT msg.message,
    msg.src_addr,
    msg.dst_addr,
    mnc.name
FROM "msg"
JOIN "mnc"
ON substring(msg.src_addr || '+' || msg.dst_addr from '38(...)') = mnc.code
share|improve this answer
    
This is going to fail because substring() only returns the first match, but one of the additional matches could be mnc.code. Consider: SELECT substring('38foo+38bar', '38(...)') = 'bar'. That's probably the reason why the OP tried regexp_matches(). –  Erwin Brandstetter Dec 30 '11 at 20:05

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