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I have for two days tried to get my program to work, this is indeed a homework-assignment and a think my algorithm should be right, using a stack to check if the tags are balanced. I would be grateful if someone knows what is wrong with the code. This is what it looks like now:

public class HtmlParser {

    private Stack<String> tagstack; // stack to collect only "<" characters.

    public HtmlParser() {
        tagstack = new Stack<String>(); 
    }

    private void processClosedTag(Scanner in) {
        tagstack.pop();
        in.next();
    }

    private void processOpenTag(Scanner in) {  
        tagstack.push(in.next()); // "<"
    }

    public boolean isCorrectlyNested(Scanner in) {
        boolean isBalanced = false;
        while(in.hasNext()) {
            if(in.hasNext("<")) 
                processOpenTag(in); //and recurse until "/>"
            else if(in.hasNext(">")) 
                processClosedTag(in);
        }
        if(tagstack.isEmpty())
            isBalanced = true;
        return isBalanced;

    }//isCorrectlyNested

}//class

When I use the scanner object "in" and call for the methods in this class nothing happens in the console it only reads the what I write but then nothing happens it doesn't even return my statements I have written like:

if(parser.isCorrectlyNested(input))
  System.out.println("Correctly Nested!"); 
else
  System.out.println("Need to nest properly");

This is of course in the main method where i use the HtmlParser instance "parser".

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3  
Which is the error? –  SJuan76 Dec 30 '11 at 13:13
    
Oh I see i forgot to post the problem, haha. When I use the scanner object "in" and call for the methods in this class nothing happens in the console it only reads the what I write but then nothing happens it doesn't even return my statements I have written like: if(parser.isCorrectlyNested(input)) System.out.println("Correctly Nested!"); else System.out.println("Need to nest properly"); This is of course in the main method where i use the HtmlParser instance "parser". –  patriques Dec 30 '11 at 13:24
    
If you say that nothing is written to console then either the code is not reached or an exception is thrown and silently catched... –  SJuan76 Dec 30 '11 at 13:29
    
The complete main method looks like this:public class HtmlMain { public static void main(String[] args) { HtmlParser parser = new HtmlParser(); System.out.println("Write your htmlstring to parse: "); Scanner input = new Scanner(System.in); if(parser.isCorrectlyNested(input)) System.out.println("Correctly Nested!"); else System.out.println("Need to nest properly"); } } –  patriques Dec 30 '11 at 13:33
1  
Please edit your answer to post your code in a readable form. –  SJuan76 Dec 30 '11 at 13:35
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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You never actually move the scanner's position if the next item is neither a less-than or greater-than symbol. Consider if the next character was an alpha-numeric string of some kind. Your while loop never returns because it never actually moves past the string if it isn't what it is looking for, so your method never returns and your output never gets executed.

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Yes this was indeed one of the problems, thank you, but still it does't run. –  patriques Dec 30 '11 at 13:53
1  
What do you mean by "doesn't run"? Compilation error, execution error, or behavioral error? –  doogle Dec 30 '11 at 16:30
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As said before you are not moving your scanner for other characters then < or >. Another point is also that you have no ending condition (you may want to exit after the first line). And the third problem is that as soon as you will encounter more closing characters than already opened ones you will get an empty stack exception...

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As a general observation of your algorithm, it would allow a statement <html>, which isn't balanced with a closing tag of </html>. Is this intended behavior? It doesn't seem like it would be.

Anyway, as stated by @odie earlier, your loop won't move past anything if it isn't an angle bracket. But the flaw is a bit deeper than that - consider your stack algorithm as such:

  • If I see an HTML tag, then it should be pushed onto the stack.

  • If I see a closing HTML tag, and it matches with the one currently at the top of the stack, then I should pop [the first element of] the stack.

This is a principle of lexical analysis; you're looking for matching tokens. You can't rely on angle brackets providing context for you.

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well, the intention was simply to balance the "<"-tags and to check if they are balanced not so much to check if their syntactical meaning is correct. But thanks for your observation. I have anyway solved it with the code below. –  patriques Jan 2 '12 at 13:07
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Just wanted to post the solution to the problem. So those who engaged themselves in the problem can see how it turned out in the end, thanks.

public class HtmlParser {

private Stack<Character> tagstack; // stack to collect only "<" characters.

public HtmlParser() {
    tagstack = new Stack<Character>();
}

public boolean isCorrectlyNested(String str) {
    boolean isBalanced = false;
    String s = str.trim();
    for(int i = 0; i < s.length(); i++) {
        if(str.charAt(i) == '<') 
            tagstack.push('<');
        if(str.charAt(i) == '>') {
            if (tagstack.isEmpty()) 
                return isBalanced;
            else 
                tagstack.pop();
            }
        }

    if(tagstack.isEmpty())
        isBalanced = true;
    return isBalanced;

}//isCorrectlyNested 

}

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After running this code, I notice that it still isn't balanced with respect to HTML specifications. The string "<html>" is balanced by your algorithm (which it shouldn't be), and so is the string "<html><p></a></html>", which it shouldn't be. –  Makoto Jan 1 '12 at 18:59
    
The intention was simply to balance the "<"-tags and to check if they are balanced not so much to check if their syntactical meaning is correct. But thanks for your observation. –  patriques Jan 2 '12 at 13:10
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